Fort Hill Tower

June 30, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

American Revolutionary War Memorial, Roxbury, Boston, Massachusetts

During the Revolutionary War, Fort Hill was known for the Roxbury High Fort that stood there. The colonial army fought a significant battle there which ended in a rare victory for them. The colonial army was on Fort Hill and the British were stationed across a small valley on Mission Hill in Jamaica Plain. In commemoration of this mostly forgotten event, there was built during the mid 1800s, a mysterious-looking memorial, a brick water storage tower with a roof that looked like a witch’s hat. Around this tower was a small park, and around that were rows of houses and small apartment buildings, facing the tower from several adjoining streets. Fort Hill Tower


The image, Fort Hill Tower, was originally uploaded by Kingdafy. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr favorites posted at “The Revolution Flickred”.


Sons of Liberty

June 27, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Providence, Rhode Island

“Upon this corner stood the Sabin Tavern in which on the evening of June 9th 1772 the Party met and organized to destroy the H.R.M Schooner Gaspee, in the destruction of which was shed the first blood in the American Revolution.”

www.gaspee.org/

The image, Sons of Liberty, was originally uploaded by Real_Bostonian. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr favorites posted at “The Revolution Flickred”.


As They Were

June 27, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Time of Revolution, Williamsburg, Virginia

The image, , was originally uploaded by I Heart Vanilla Pesto. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr favorites posted at “The Revolution Flickred”.


Duke of Gloucester Street.

June 27, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

General Cornwallis riding down Duke of Gloucester Street, Williamsburg, Virginia, with a spare pony it seems. Is the hidden pony the Macaroni of “Yankee Doodle”?

The image, Cornwallis rides Duke of Gloucester Street., was originally uploaded by I Heart Vanilla Pesto. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr favorites posted at “The Revolution Flickred”.


The Redcoats Are Coming

June 22, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Reenactment at the 225th Anniversary of the Siege on Star Fort, South Carolina.

Historic Star Fort was located near the town of Ninety Six. It had been built by the British to protect early settlers in the area from Indian attacks. In 1775, it became the site of the first land battle of the Revolutionary War fought south of New England. Later, General Nathanael Greene and 1,000 of his troops laid siege to the star-shaped fort. Although he was unable to dislodge the 550 British Loyalists defending Star Fort, General Greene is credited with staging the longest siege of the Revolutionary War.

The image, muskets1.jpg, was originally uploaded by croftorama. It is posted here from Neddy's flickr favorites posted at "The Revolution Flickred".


Cambridge Commons

June 22, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

"Under this tree at WASHINGTON first took command OF THE AMERICAN ARMY July 3rd 1775" This memorial to General George Washington is at Cambridge Commons in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

The image, Cambridge_Cambridge Commons_Washington took command, was originally uploaded by wallyg. It is posted here from Neddy's flickr favorites posted at "The Revolution Flickred".


Revolutionary Generals

June 21, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Nathanael Greene and Thomas Sumter appearing at the 225th Anniversary of the Siege on Star Fort.

General Thomas Sumter was born in Virginia on August 14, 1734. Like George Washington he had a lackluster education and engaged in surveying. He became a sergeant in the Virginia Militia's campaign against the Cherokees. His exploits during that time were exemplary and heroic. However, when he briefly returned to his home in Virginia, he was arrested for an old debt. He escaped from Staunton Prison and made his way overland to South Carolina where he invested his savings in land and slaves, opened a crossroads store and earned such respect from the community that he was made a justice of the peace in 1766.

In a biography of General Joseph Martin, there is a letter from his son William Martin which contains an anecdote. It first appeared in the "Virginia Magazine of History and Biography", volume 8, number 4 (April, 1901). Joseph Martin and Thomas Sumter had served together in the Indian Wars.

This was during the war '56, and here I will digress a little from the thread of the narrative, in order to bring in an anecdote, showing in a small way something of the features of the times; for it is by smalls that you get a whole. My father in his raising among other boys of the same temperament, became associated with Tom _____, General Sumpter, who so distinguished himself as the partizan chief in South Carolina during the war of the Revolution, and went with him to the war. Behold these two hapless youths, those turbulent spirits that could not be tamed with the ordinary pursuits of civil life, rushing along like water seeking its own level, four or five hundred miles through mostly a wilderness interspersed with hostile savages in quest of aliment that might satisfy their craving appetites. Little did they, or any body else think at the time, that these were some of the rising spirits that were to lead in the revolution which afterwards gave liberty to this country. How long they remained in the army or the part they acted there, is not known, though it is thought a good while. Sumpter returned first. My father, on his return, found him in jail at Staunton, Virginia, for debt. He obtained permission to lodge a night in prison with his friend. In the morning, when he went out he left with Sumpter his tomahawk and ten guineas, and with one or both of which he escaped from prison. Soon afterwards he went to South Carolina, changed his course of life and became distinguished, as is known to all who have read the history of the Revolution. Thus were they separated for many years; and until at length my father was at Richmond, Virginia, a member of the legislature; Sumpter was a member of Congress, and on his way home called at Richmond where they met for the first time in more than thirty years. What a meeting this must have been! to talk over old matters and things! They had both now become old and highly elevated in the temple of Fame. What proud satisfaction they must have felt in the retrospection! Before they separated Sumpter handed my father twenty guineas — having reference to the prison.

The image, Nathanael Greene and Thomas Sumter, was originally uploaded by croftorama. It is posted here from Neddy's flickr favorites posted at "The Revolution Flickred".


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