Tales of Revolution


Revolutionary War Image

Slideshow of The Battle of White Plains

During September and October of 1776, rebel troops led by George Washington who was seeking the safety of higher ground, took up positions in the hills of the New York village of White Plains. They were being hotly pursued by British and Hessian troops under command of General Sir William Howe, who attacked the Americans on October 28th. The Battle of White Plains was fought primarily on Chatterton Hill, located west of a swamp in the Bronx River Valley, which is now the downtown area of White Plains. Washington, seeing that the Americans were greatly outnumbered, retreated on 31 October 1776.

When the dance was at an end, Ichabod was attracted to a knot of the sager folks, who, with Old Van Tassel, sat smoking at one end of the piazza, gossiping over former times, and drawing out long stories about the war.

“This neighborhood, at the time of which I am speaking, was one of those highly favored places which abound with chronicle and great men. The British and American line had run near it during the war; it had, therefore, been the scene of marauding and infested with refugees, cowboys, and all kinds of border chivalry. Just sufficient time had elapsed to enable each storyteller to dress up his tale with a little becoming fiction, and, in the indistinctness of his recollection, to make himself the hero of every exploit.

“There was the story of Doffue Martling, a large blue-bearded Dutchman, who had nearly taken a British frigate with an old iron nine-pounder from a mud breastwork, only that his gun burst at the sixth discharge. And there was an old gentleman who shall be nameless, being too rich a mynheer to be lightly mentioned, who, in the battle of White Plains, being an excellent master of defence, parried a musket-ball with a small sword, insomuch that he absolutely felt it whiz round the blade, and glance off at the hilt; in proof of which he was ready at any time to show the sword, with the hilt a little bent. There were several more that had been equally great in the field, not one of whom but was persuaded that he had a considerable hand in bringing the war to a happy termination.” (THE LEGEND OF SLEEPY HOLLOW by Washington Irving)

The image, BackShot, is subject to copyright by Snowshoeman. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, an administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.

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