Women of the Revolution

July 1, 2008

Revolutionary War Image

Yes … there were women in battle during the American Revolution. Some were wives, some were mothers, some were hangers on. The women pictured here are reenacting seamstresses employed in mending or sewing during the sultry New Jersey summer of 1778, at the Battle of Monmouth. It was here on the 27th of June, that one of the Molly Pitchers became famous for joining the fight when her husband was shot while manning a cannon.

Betty Jackson, the mother of future president Andrew Jackson joined the war as a nurse, after two of her sons became infected with smallpox while imprisoned by the British. (See Andrew Jackson in Lafayette Square. )

Learn More: The American Revolution

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The image, Spinsters, is subject to copyright by Mark K_NJ. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Historic Yorktown, Virginia

October 12, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Yorktown Day is celebrated annually at Yorktown, Virginia on October 19th. The holiday memorializes the surrender of the British forces on the 19th of October 1781, ending the Battle of Yorktown and bringing about the end of the American Revolutionary War. This year’s Yorktown Day celebration is special because it marks 225 years since the earth-shattering event.

During a typical Yorktown Day events include a parade, speeches from various patriotic groups such as the Daughters of the American Revolution, wreath-laying at gravesites in the area, and reenactments of the Battle and the surrender.

2006 Schedule of Events

October 19-22 – Yorktown 225th Weekend (Yorktown Battlefield).
Celebrating 400 years fo the American military, this four-day event will commemorate the 225th anniversary of the final battle of the American Revolution that secured indenpendence for the United States. Special programs and tours include military encampments, band concerts, fireworks and a waterfront festival. Colonial National Historical Park, Yorktown, VA, (757) 898-2410. Free.

October 19 – Yorktown Day (Yorktown Battlefield).
Ceremonies, a parade and tactical demonstrations by the Commander-i-Chief’s Guard commemorate the 225rd anniversary of America’s climactic Revolutionary War victory at Yorktown. Jointly sponsored by the National Park Service and the Yorktown Day Association. Colonial National Historical Park, Yorktown, VA, (757) 898-2410. Free.

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The image, 100_0643, is subject to copyright by DanRhett. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Yorktown Battlefield

August 16, 2006

flickr
Yorktown Victory Monument, Yorktown Battlefield at Yorktown, Virginia

To declare independence is one thing, to achieve it is another. Here it was actually achieved…. The victory at Yorktown gave us that independence which the American patriots had boldly proclaimed to the world” ~~Dr. Ray Lyman Wilbur, Secretary of the Interior, 1931

The image, Detail of Victory Monument, was originally uploaded by beebo wallace. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr favorites.


Yorktown Memorial

August 9, 2006

flickr
Yorktown Victory Monument, Yorktown Battlefield at Yorktown, Virginia

Yorktown Battlefield was the site of the last major battle of the American Revolutionary War, a war that secured independence for the new United States and changed the course of world history.

In August 1781, the British army under General Charles Lord Cornwallis began fortifying Yorktown and Gloucester Point, located across the York River from Yorktown, to establish a naval base in Virginia. In nearby Williamsburg, the Marquis de Lafayette with a small army of Continental troops and Virginia militia, kept a watchful eye on Cornwallis’ activities. At the end of August, to Cornwallis’ surprise, a French fleet commanded by Admiral Francois De Grasse blockaded the Chesapeake Bay and the York River, preventing Cornwallis from escaping or being reinforced by sea. At the same time, General George Washington began moving his allied American and French forces from New York to Virginia. By the end of September, Washington’s army of 17,600 had surrounded Cornwallis’ 8,300 troops and laid siege to Yorktown leading to the surrender of Cornwallis on October 19, 1781. Upon hearing of their defeat, British Prime Minister Frederick Lord North is reputed to have said, “Oh God, it’s all over.” And it was. The Allied victory at Yorktown effectively ended the war. (The Yorktown Homepage)

The image, Victory Monument, was originally uploaded by beebo wallace. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr favorites.


French Canon at Yorktown

July 20, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

French Canon from the American Revolution on the Yorktown Battlefield of October 1781, Yorktown, Virginia, showing the decorative detail of the casting. (5)

The image, 100_1203, was originally uploaded at Flickr by DanRhett. It is posted here by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Yorktown Battlefield Cemetery

July 19, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Yorktown, Virginia

The image, Memorial Day, was originally uploaded at Flickr by StJohns/VaBeach. It is posted here by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Great Bridge Battlefield

July 13, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Great Bridge, Virginia, 18 June 2006.

The Battle of Great Bridge, fought on December 9, 1775, was an important event in the early stages of our nation’s struggle for independence. There were times in our history when it was widely known as a significant national event that greatly contributed to the cause of freedom. Now we have the opportunity to revitalize that heritage, and preserve for posterity the history of events in Hampton Roads that impacted the evolution of a diverse people into a union that cherishes a national independence and individual freedom.

Great Bridge Battlefield & Waterfront History Foundation

Located at Battlefield Boulevard, Great Bridge, Virginia. The image Great Bridge Monument, was originally uploaded at Flickr by stdyhstry. It is posted here by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool. (2)


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