Mount Vernon Cake

March 17, 2006

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Someone, somewhere, remembers the legacy of the Washingtons of Mount Vernon, Virginia. In times past, on Christmas Day, visitors to the Mount Vernon estate were offered copies of the original recipe for Martha Washington’s famous cake.

Martha Washington’s Great Cake

(One of Mrs. Washington’s favorite recipes)

Martha's Great Cake (Shown 1/4th Actual Size!)

“Take 40 eggs and divide the whites from the yolks and beat them to a froth. Then work 4 pounds of butter to a cream and put the whites of eggs to it a Spoon full at a time till it is well work’d. Then put 4 pounds of sugar finely powdered to it in the same manner then put in the Yolks of eggs and 5 pounds of flour and 5 pounds of fruit. 2 hours will bake it. Add to it half an ounce of mace and nutmeg half a pint of wine and some fresh brandy.”

Notes: In making the great cake, Mount Vernon’s curatorial staff followed Mrs. Washington’s recipe almost exactly. Where the recipe called for 5 pounds of fruit, without specifying which ones, 2 pounds of raisins, 1 pound of currants, and 2 pounds of apples were used. The wine used was cream sherry. Since no pan large enough was available to hold all the batter, two 14 (inch) layers were made and stacked (note: the original was one single tall layer). The layers were baked in a 350 degree oven for 1.5 hours. Should be iced with a very stiff egg-white based icing, flavored with rosewater or orange-flower water.

The image, Another shot of Liz’s Mount Vernon cake, was originally uploaded by readhd59. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr favorites.

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Patriot Alexander Hamiliton

March 14, 2006

Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow is a great book!

Alexander Hamilton The author brings to life a forefather who left a more lasting legacy on American history than some of the men who attained the Presidency. The young Hamilton experienced a brutal childhood as an orphan in the West Indies, yet his inherent brilliance enabled him to become aide de camp to the great General George Washington, a battlefield hero, the primary author of the Federalist Papers, the catalyst for the two party political system, and the first Secretary of the Treasury. As the architect of our financial system, Hamilton’s skill enabled our fledgling country to survive and prosper. Author Chernow masterfully writes the story of Alexander Hamilton as an entertaining and well-documented 700 plus page saga. Our forefathers were astonishing men, men of their times, and Ron Chernow tells us that Hamilton was one of them.

Editorials of Alexander Hamilton


Hancock Memorial

March 5, 2006

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On a frigid morning in March of 1778, during the American Revolutionary War, the Hancock House in Salem County, New Jersey was the site where more than thirty local militia men were ambushed and brutally murdered by British soldiers. This image, memorial, was originally uploaded by Ben McLeod. It is posted here from flickr favorites. Linked at Mudville Gazette's "Open Post".


Hancock House

March 5, 2006
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There was a massacre in the Hancock House, Hancocks Bridge, New Jersey, during the Revolutionary War. The old home is now claimed to be haunted. The Story of the Hancock House. The image, hancock house, was originally uploaded by Ben McLeod. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr favorites.

French and Indian Cemetery

March 1, 2006

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Among the graves at the Old Cathedral “French and Indian” Cemetery in Vincennes, Indiana are soldiers and patriots of the American Revolution who helped General George Rogers Clark to capture Fort Sackville in 1779. On the grounds stood a log church where the people of Vincennes swore an oath of allegience to the Republic of Virginia and the United States on 20 July 1778. Read the rest of this entry »


Jean Marie Philippe LeGras

March 1, 2006
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This is one of the graves of soldiers and patriots of the American Revolution at the Old Cathedral “French and Indian” Cemetery in Vincennes, Indiana. The image, Jean Marie Philippe LeGras, was originally uploaded by cindy47452. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr favorites.

Michel Brouillette

March 1, 2006
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This is one of the graves of soldiers and patriots of the American Revolution at the Old Cathedral “French and Indian” Cemetery in Vincennes, Indiana.

I did a bit of research and found that he was Lieutenant Michael BROUILLETTE, born about 1745, in Canada, who lived at Vincennes, Illinois County, Virginia. He served as a Virginia soldier with General George Rogers CLARK of Revolutionary War fame. His wife was Maria (or Ann) CHARBONNEAU BARBE and some of their children were Michel, Jr. who married Marie Louise DeRICHARDVILLE, and Pierre B. who married Julia BOUCHER. Michael BROUILLETTE died in 1796, at Knox County, Indiana. That is all I know

The image, Michel Brouillette, was originally uploaded by cindy47452. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr favorites.