Plaque on Fraunces Tavern

July 23, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Fraunces Tavern Web Site

The image, IMG_0031, was originally uploaded at Flickr by Krez who owns its copyright and can be contacted at the previous link. The image is posted here with that owner’s permission by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool. (6)


Fraunces Tavern

July 23, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

This structure at 54 Pearl Street in New York City’s Financial District, is Manhattan’s oldest surviving building. It was originally built in 1719, as a home for Stephen Delancey, a Huguenot refugee and merchant. In 1762, the building came into the possession of Samuel Fraunces who opened it as a tavern. It remains so today, serving lunch and dinner. It now also houses the Fraunces Tavern Museum.

During the American Revolution, the building had become famous, not for its good food and drink, but for its rebellious politics. The Sons of Liberty held meetings here before the British occupation. Festivities were held at the tavern for Evacuation Day on November 25, 1783.

One week later, in December of 1783, George Washington made his farewell to the officers of the Continental Army in this tavern. It was an emotional speech which publicly insured that the new United States of America would not become a military dictatorship. From thence, the general retired to his farm in Virginia. Six years later, in 1789, George Washington returned to New York City, the capitol of the United States, to be sworn in as the first president.

The image, Fraunces Tavern-NYC, was originally uploaded at Flickr by Iseult who owns its copyright and can be contacted at the previous link. The image is posted here with that owner’s permission by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.(110)


Fraunces Tavern Sign

July 23, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

New York City, New York
The image, Fraunces Tavern, was originally uploaded at Flickr by Harry J.Bizzarro who owns its copyright and can be contacted at the previous link. The image is posted here with that owner’s permission by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.(5)


Fraunces Tavern Interior

July 23, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Located in the Financial District of lower Manhattan, New York City.

At the close of the war, on December 4, 1783, General George Washington bade farewell to his officers at a banquet held in the Long Room, located on the second floor of the Fraunces Tavern. The proprietor, Samuel Fraunces, a West Indian of French ancestry, later became Washington’s chief steward. Fraunces, also an American patriot, played host to secret meetings of the Sons of Liberty and gave aid to American prisoners of war. The present building, purchased by the Sons of the Revolution (not S.A.R.) in 1904, was extensively restored and has since been maintained by them, according to a plaque on the side of the building.

Fraunces Tavern Museum

The image, Fraunces Tavern., was originally uploaded at Flickr by gak who owns its copyright and can be contacted at the previous link. The image is posted here with that owner’s permission by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.(17)


Tomb of Benjamin Franklin

July 23, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

The grave of Benjamin Franklin and his wife, Deborah lay beside the grave of their daughter and her husband at Christ Church Cemetery, Philadelphia. Franklin said “A penny saved is a penny earned”, yet visitors throw pennies on his grave. It is said that the discarded pennies amount to about $6,000 each year, which is donated to the poor. A section of the wall has been cut out next to his grave so that visitors can see it at all times.

The image, _MG_5113-Benjamin Franklin’s Grave, was originally uploaded at Flickr by Elwyn who owns its copyright and can be contacted at the previous link. The image is posted here with that owner’s permission by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.(12)


Fort Dorchester

July 22, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Fort Dorchester was built on the Ashly River of South Carolina in 1757. The construction was of “tabby,” a concrete-like mixture of sand, oyster shells and lime. During the American Revolution the fort failed to secure the nearby community of 17th century Dorchester from the British, who overran the fort and occupied and sacked the town in 1780.

Fort Dorchester was commanded by Francis Marion, the “Swamp Fox”, of South Carolina. These are the ruins of a powder magazine which once stood within. The ruins are Fort Dorchester are located near present day Summerville.

The image, Fort Dorchester, was originally uploaded at Flickr by barefootboatnik. It is posted here by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.(13)


Chicago’s Monument to Patriots

July 21, 2006
Revolutionary War Image

The George Washington-Robert Morris-Hyam Salomon Memorial was designed by Lorado Taft, whose own ancestors fought in the Revolutionary War. It is one of but a few monuments honoring non military patriots. The statue shows General George Washington clasping hands with civilian supporters, English born Robert Morris and Polish born Hyam Salomon, who was a Jew. These two men were financiers of the Revolutionary War, raising thousands of dollars to support the American Army in its battle against tyranny.

The memorial was designated a Chicago Landmark on September 15, 1971, by the City Council of Chicago.

The image, Chicago – The George Washington-Robert Morris-Hyam Salomon Memorial, was originally uploaded at Flickr by wallyg. It is posted here by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.