600-Mile March To Victory

August 29, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

On August 27, 2006, on North Maple Avenue, Basking Ridge, New Jersey, these hearty and happy reenactors were marching on to victory in Virginia. This summer marks the 225th anniversary of the 600-mile march from Rhode Island to Virginia that led to the siege at Yorktown and ended with the spectacular military victory that finally convinced the British to leave the old colony. The end of the Revolutionary War came two years later.

It’s a singular event in American history — that you have thousands of troops of an allied power on American soil,” said historian Robert Selig, who has worked with the National Park Service and the New Jersey Historic Trust in researching the routes.

The story is recounted by the Star-Ledger newspaper in “In the Footsteps of Our Forefathers” BY KRISTEN ALLOWAY. She wrote that “The Revolution happened in your backyard, Even if it was just for a few days in 1781 and 1782.” INDEED, it is true for me, as I live very near the well marked route that Rochambeau and his French army travelled on their way to Yorktown. See Washington-Rochambeau Route, 2005.
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The image, 600-mile march from Rhode Island to Virginia, is subject to copyright by sheena1chi. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.(39)


South Boston Soldier

August 28, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

General George Washington took advantage of the location of Dorchester Heights during the seige of Boston and was able to eventually drive out the British. This beautifully manifested image is from a re-enactment in South Boston in March of 2005, where an original cannon from that campaign was displayed.

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The image, Men From The Past in Sepia, is subject to copyright by alohadave. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.(76)


British Retreat Route

August 26, 2006
Revolutionary War Image

Church Street — Middletown, New Jersey

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The image, British Retreat Route, is subject to copyright by sheena1chi. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Last Man of the Revolution

August 23, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Private Samuel Downing has gone down in history as one of “The Last Men of the Revolution”.

According to descendants, at the time this photograph was made in 1864, Samuel Downing, was a centurian, and one of the six living soldiers from the Revolutionary War. This portrait of the old soldier was made by famed Civil War-era photographer Matthew Brady.

“DOWNING, SAMUEL” is a documented DAR Patriot Ancestor, #A034292. He was baptised on 1 December 1764, at NEWBURYPORT, ESSEX CO, MASSACHUSETTS and died on 18 February 1867, at EDINBURGH, SARATOGA CO, NEW YORK. He served as a Private from NEW HAMPSHIRE and received a pension for his services, #S40055. Samuel and Eunice GEORGE, his wife, lived in this house, and are buried in this cemetery.

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The image, Samuel Downing, was contributed by shsukatsfan. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Captain Molly Corbin

August 21, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

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The grave of Margaret “Captain Molly” Corbin (1751-1800) is at West Point, New York at the side of the U.S.M.A. Chapel. When the British attacked Fort Washington in 1776, she was wounded in action while substituting for her fallen husband who lay at her side. For her heroism in battle the Congress awarded her a pension. Today, her memorial which was erected in 1926, by the New York Daughters of the American Revolution serves as inspiration for female cadets at all of the military academies. Margaret Corbin at Wikipedia.

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The image, USMA – West Point, NY, is subject to copyright by sheena1chi. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, an administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool. (2)


First Washington Monument

August 18, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

The very first memorial to President George Washington was erected in Baltimore, Maryland and now stands in Mount Vernon Square. I remember it well from my high school days, as it stood at the top of Howard Street as I was walking to Western High School.

The 160 foot white marble tower was completed on July 4th, 1829. It depicts General Washington in 1783, as he resigned his commission from the Continental Army at the statehouse in Annapolis, Maryland. The tower was designed by Robert Mills, the new nation’s first American-born and American-educated architect, who nineteen years later, designed the most famous Washington Monument in Washington, DC.

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The image, Baltimore – Mt Vernon: Four Garden Squares and Washington Monument, is subject to copyright by wallyg. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.(20)


Yorktown Battlefield

August 16, 2006

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Yorktown Victory Monument, Yorktown Battlefield at Yorktown, Virginia

To declare independence is one thing, to achieve it is another. Here it was actually achieved…. The victory at Yorktown gave us that independence which the American patriots had boldly proclaimed to the world” ~~Dr. Ray Lyman Wilbur, Secretary of the Interior, 1931

The image, Detail of Victory Monument, was originally uploaded by beebo wallace. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr favorites.