America’s Last King

January 29, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

King George III, at Lincoln Castle, Lincoln, England

King George was the ruler of Great Britain during the American Revolution. He was beloved by his people for being a good and patriotic ruler, however he managed to lose the greatest colonies of the empire, the American colonies. Later in life he suffered bouts of what seemed like mental illness at the time, which modern science has diagnosed as a hereditary disease named porphyria. By 1810, had become known as “Mad King George” and was often restrained with straight jackets because of increased insanity. He died on 28 January 1820, at the age of 82.

This Bust of King George III at Lincoln Castle was once part of a complete statue of the monarch. In 1810, to celebrate the Golden Jubilee of George the III’s reign, the Earl of Buckingham ordered the placement of a statue of his monarch on the top of the famous 18th century Dunstan Pillar. Tragically, the mason performing the installation fell to his death while erecting it. Then in 1940, the entire statue was removed as a danger to low flying aircraft. The now damaged statue is stored at Lincoln Castle, however the bust of King George III is publicly displayed on the Lincoln Castle grounds.

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The image, Bust of King George III, Lincoln Castle, Lincoln, is subject to copyright by Lincolnian. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool. (0184)


Watching the Crossing

January 21, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

Six months after celebrating the signing of the Declaration of Independence, George Washington’s army was nearly vanquished. He had lost ninety percent of his men and the American Revolution was almost lost. The world’s most powerful military had routed the Americans at New York, was in occupation of three of the new American states, and it was marching on Philadelphia. When George Washington was driven across the Delaware River, panic and despair was abroad throughout the new republic.

However, General Washington, and some others, did now allow the ‘Spirit of 76’ to die. As British and Hessian troops marched across New Jersey, the people of that former colony took a stand against them. On Christmas night of 1776, when a terrible winter storm struck, George Washington saw opportunity. He led his men back across the Delaware River where they ferociously attacked the Hessian troops at Trenton, killing and capturing nearly one thousand soldiers. A second battle of Trenton followed within days and then, when Lord Cornwallis counterattacked with his very best troops, the Americans held them off. Giving no quarter, under cover of night, Washington sent his men behind the enemy’s lines and struck them again, defeating them at Princeton, New Jersey. After twelve weeks of fighting in the dead of winter, the British army was severely damaged, its strategy ruined, and the psche of its leaders broadly shaken. New Jersey was freed from British hold.

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The image, Young and old are called for duty, is subject to copyright by nancydowd. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Washington’s Crossing

January 5, 2007

Washington’s Crossing and the Battle of Trenton ~ Relive those thrilling days of yesteryear when we were revolutionaries fighting for liberty and justice for ourselves and for all mankind.

At the Battle of Trenton which took place on December 26, 1776, Washington chased the British out of New Jersey. All four Hessian colonels in Trenton were killed during the battle.

Learn More: The American Revolution