Elbridge Gerry

March 21, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

Elbridge GERRY (1744-1814) of Massachusetts is the only signer of the Declaration of Independence who is buried in Washington, DC. He also had signed the Articles of Confederation. He served as governor of Massachusetts and as the fifth Vice President of the United States, under James MADISON.

He is most interestingly know for being the namesake of the word and political act of “gerrymandering”.

Learn More: The American Revolution

Save To: gif ”Digg”

The image, Elbridge Gerry, is subject to copyright by dbking. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Ethan Allen Statue

March 20, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

Fort Ticonderoga National Historic Landmark

As the Revolutionary War was getting underway, only a half-company of British soldiers were manning Fort Ticonderoga. Both Ethan Allen and Benedict Arnold had realized that adjacent British forts, Ticonderoga and Crown Point, made easy targets for their American rebels. They decided to capture the cannons at both forts. On the night of May 10, 1775, Ethan Allen, Benedict Arnold, and their band of 83 Green Mountain Boys rowed across Lake Champlain from Vermont and surprised the redcoats in their slumber, making Fort Ticonderoga America’s first offensive victory of the war. The fort then became an important staging area for the rebels. The first American navy ships were rigged and fitted there. Commanded by Benedict Arnold, this fledgling naval fleet fought the Battle of Valcour Island on Lake Champlain in 1776. Although the Americans were roundly defeated, the fight impeded the British march south. The following year, in July 1777, British General Burgoyne, invaded the Champlain Valley from Canada and mounted cannon at Mount Defiance, overlooking Fort Ticonderoga. This forced the fort’s commander to evacuate his army, which returned Fort Ticonderoga to British hands. September of 1777, saw the final military engagement at the fort, when the Americans tried and failed to retake it.

Learn More: The American Revolution

Save To: gif ”Digg”

The image, Ethan Allen Statue and Antique Cannon, is subject to copyright by Old Shoe Woman. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Patriots’ Graves

March 18, 2007

Revolutionary War Image 

Revolutionary War Graveyard in Salem, New York.

After the Battle of Saratoga in 1777, according to local legend, about 100 soldiers’ bodies were loaded like “cord wood” onto wagons and brought to Salem’s burying grounds and placed in a common grave. In addition, this cemetery contains documented remains of 101 soldiers and veterans of the American Revolution, making it probably the cemetery with the greatest number of Revolutionary War soldiers in New York State.

Listing of the Soldier Burials

Learn More: The American Revolution

Save To: gif ”Digg”

The image, FALLEN SOLDIERS, is subject to copyright by MIKECNY. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Molly Pitcher in Battle

March 17, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

The Battle of Monmouth took place on the 27th of June in 1778. It was at this battle where a Molly Pitcher became famous for fetching pitchers of water in the summer heat for the battle weary soldiers.   

This painting is a “New Deal” mural showing a legendary Molly Pitcher at the Battle of Monmouth. It was commissioned by the United States Treasury Department during the Great Depression and was completed in 1935, by artist, Gerald Foster. Owned by the United States Postal Service, the artwork is currently on loan to the Monmouth Coounty, New Jersey Library where it is on display at the Library’s headquarters.

Learn More: The American Revolution

Save To: gif ”Digg”

The image, Monmouth County Library Headquarters, is subject to copyright by sheena1chi. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Castle Hill, Rhode Island

March 10, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

This beautiful 19th century lighthouse now occupies Castle Hill, at the east passage of Narragansett Bay near Newport, Rhode Island. However during the American Revolutionary War there was an 18th century watchtower with a battery of cannons nearby. In April of 1776, the HMS Scarborough and the HMS Cimetar were attacked from this point. The British ships had been run out of Newport harbor by American patriots who had stolen two ships from the British fleet. The warships Scarborough and Cimetar gave chase, but rebel cannon fire from every side forced them to anchor between Jamestown and Rose Island. Soon cannon fire erupted from the nearby shore and the Scarborough and Cimetar sailed unpeaceably away.

Learn More: The American Revolution

Save To: gif ”Digg”

The image, Castle Hill Lighthouse, is subject to copyright by Dragonmetal. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


‘Mad” Anthony Wayne

March 4, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

The statue of Revolutionary War General “Mad” Anthony Wayne stands at Valley Forge National Military Park, Valley Forge, Pennsylvania.

Anthony Wayne (January 1, 1745 – December 15, 1796), served as an army general and statesman. Wayne was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania and trained as a surveyor. When Revolutionary War broke out he immediately changed careers to that of a military officer. By his great military exploits and fiery personality he quickly gained a promotion to general and the nickname of “Mad Anthony Wayne”.

Many place names throughout the United States are now named for him. The comic character Batman was based upon his personality and even the movie actor, John Wayne, was named for him. See another view of this statue and read more about Anthony Wayne HERE.

Learn More: The American Revolution

Save To: gif ”Digg”

The image, 215_1507, is subject to copyright by dbking. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.