The Swamp Fox

April 23, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

He was Francis Marion (1732-1795) of South Carolina.

In the year 2006, the U.S. House of Representatives finally approved a monument to General Francis Marion, to be built in Washington, D.C. The bill, however, died in the Senate and was reintroduced in January, 2007.

Marion began his military career in June of 1775. When he joined General Horatio Gates just before the Battle of Camden, Gates had no confidence in him and got rid of him by giving him command of the Williamsburg Militia in the Pee Dee area of the colony.

With his militiamen irregulars Marion proved himself to be a leader. “Marion’s Men” served without pay, supplied their own horses, arms, and often their own rations. They became quite adept at capturing their needed supplies from the Tories.

The British came to despise Marion and made repeated efforts to destroy his force, but Marion had excellent intelligence gathering ability and was always able to outsmart them. In desparation, the British sent Colonel Banastre Tarleton to capture the “old swamp fox”, who eluded the enemy by travelling the swamp paths.

Once Marion showed his ability as a guerilla fighter he was commissioned a brigadier-general of South Carolina troops. Francis Marion is buried at Belle Isle Plantation Cemetery in Berkeley County, South Carolina, where his gravestone records that he “lived without fear, and died without reproach.

This sculpture created by T.J. Dixon and James Nelson, is at the corner of Broad and Main in Greenville, South Carolina.

The image, Francis Marion The Swamp Fox, 1732-1795, is subject to copyright by sisudave. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.

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The Daffodils Remember

April 22, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

This colonnaded monument commemorates the unknown soldiers of The Battle of Princeton on the 3rd of January 1777, in New Jersey. After the Battle of Trenton, British General Howe sent a large force of professional military to New Jersey. General George Washington was in command of the 5000 American rebels. Washington decided to once again launch a surprise attack against the British. His plan succeeded; the defeated British removed their soldiers from most of New Jersey and American morale was greatly boosted.

George Washington at Princeton

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The image, Colonnade with Daffodils, is subject to copyright by Ragnvaeig. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


George Mason

April 19, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

Few of America’s founding fathers have had a more lasting impact upon our nation than a shy, cerebral planter from Virginia, a Fairfax County neighbor of George Washington, George Mason of Gunston Hall.

All men are born equally free and independent, and have certain inherent natural rights, of which they can not by any compact, deprive or divest their posterity; among which are the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety; proclaimed George Mason to Virginia’s patriots and to the world, in the spring of 1776.

Closet Tories and aristocrats trembled with fear at the idea of all mankind being equally free, but George Mason’s wondrous words of hope survived, promising human rights for all. When you demand your rights, say a prayer of gratitude to George Mason of Virginia, father of the Bill of Rights. The Fifth Virginia Convention of 1776, on June 12th, adopted George Mason’s Declaration of Rights, a precursor to the United States Bill of Rights. On June 29th, the Convention approved the first Constitution of Virginia.

This statue of George Mason is seen at the Welcome Center at his home, Gunston Hall, Mason Neck, Virginia. There is more at My Picasa Albums picasaweb.google.com/barneykin/GunstonHall.

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The image, George Mason, is subject to copyright by barneykin. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, an administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


18th of April in ’75

April 18, 2007

On the 18th of April in ‘75

On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five; Hardly a man is now alive, Who remembers that famous day and year…. ~~Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, from The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere

Slide Show of the Events of 1775  from “The Revolution Flickred.”

The 18th of April 1775 saw the Battle of Lexington and Concord of the American Revolutionary War. British General Thomas Gage attempted to confiscate the firearms of the American colonists. The British were driven back to Boston, Massachusetts, thus beginning the American Revolutionary War.


Patriots’ Graves

April 2, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

This cemetery in Louisville, Georgia is the final resting place of American patriots of the Revolutionary War.  At the Flickr group, “The Revolution Flickred” we are collecting images of gravesites of these patriots, which can be viewed here: Patriot Graves of ’76.

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The image, Louisville, GA, is subject to copyright by Robert 345. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.