John Paul Jones

September 17, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

I have not yet begun to fight!

In 1953, John Paul Jones was remembered by Americans as “The Fighting Sailor.” He was actually much more than that.

He was born John Paul in 1747, on the southern coast of Scotland. He began his career as a mariner at the age of 13, when he sailed out of Whitehaven as a ship’s apprentice. During his sailing career, he had numerous contacts with his brother who had settled at Fredericksburg, Virginia.

He adopted the alias of “John Jones”, at the suggestion of this brother, when he fled to his Virginia home in 1773, to avoid execution after an incident where he was accused of murdering a sailor under his command. When the American Revolution commenced, he was using the name “John Paul Jones.” Although he is considered the father of the United States Navy, he never rose above the rank of Captain in the Continental Navy. With his highly regarded command of the frigate Bonhomme Richard, John Paul Jones became America’s first naval hero. He later earned the rank of Admiral for his service with the Russian Navy. He spent his last days abroad and ended up being buried in Paris, France. Years later his remains were brought home and reinterred at the United States Navy Academy chapel, in Annapolis, Maryland.

He is most famous for his legendary reply when a British officer asked for his surrender during battle: I have not yet begun to fight!

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The image, John Paul Jones: Fighting Sailor, 1953, is subject to copyright by Marxchivist. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


John Paul Jones

August 3, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Memorial Plaque, Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington DC

“I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast, for I intend to go in harm’s way.” ~John Paul Jones, Naval Hero of the American Revolution and Father of the American Navy.

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The image, Navy Memorial 3-D plaque – John Paul Jones, is subject to copyright by etacar11. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


A Hero’s Home

February 11, 2009

Revolutionary War Image

This is the John Paul Jones House on Caroline Street in Fredericksburg, Virginia. The photograph was made between 1910 and 1915, when the building was occupied by Gately’s Groceries. The old photograph is from the collection of the Library of Congress. This was the only home in America of John Paul Jones, an American Revolutionary War hero and father of the United States Navy. His most famous words were “I have not yet begun to fight!” Today, the John Paul Jones home serves as a “Seafarers Coffee House.” Fredericksblogger has a photograph of the way it is today.

Sail Fast in Harm’s Way – John Paul Jones

The image, John Paul Jones House, Fredericksburg, Va. (LOC), is subject to copyright by The Library of Congress. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, an administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


The Lucky Sloop of the Revolution

July 18, 2008

Revolutionary War Image

The Providence was the first ship of the Rhode Island Navy during the American Revolution. The sloop was first named Katy and was built in Providence, Rhode Island. When she became part of the fleet of the Continental Navy, her name was changed to Providence.

She was the first command of John Paul Jones in the American Navy, and she became nicknamed “The Lucky Sloop” for the more than forty battles that she won. In 1779, Providence was scuttled by her own crew to prevent the British from taking her. Her remains now lay at the bottom of the Penobscot River, near Bucksport, Maine. This 126 foot replica was built in 1976, in honor of America’s Bicentennial.

History of the Sloop Providence

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The image, Providence, is subject to copyright by Sparechange63. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Sail Fast In Harm’s Way

February 6, 2008

Revolutionary War Image

John Paul Jones – Father of the American Navy: “Sail fast, for I intend to go in harm’s way.”

This monument of an American freedom fighter is at West Potomac Park, Washington, DC 20037 (Google Map). It is a short walk from Signers’ Island and DAR Constitution Hall. John Paul Jones is buried in the crypt below the chapel at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. For more information about this famous sailor see John Paul Jones .

Learn More: The American Revolution

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The image, John Paul Jones – Father of the American Navy, is subject to copyright by Sheena 2.0™. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.