Washington’s Headquarters – Brandywine Battlefield

January 19, 2012

Revolutionary War Image

On the eve of the Battle of Brandywine, George Washington established his headquarters in the home of a Quaker farmer and miller, Benjamin Ring. The house was near Chadd’s Ford where the British were expected to cross the river. With superior tacts and knowledge of the terrain, the British easily outwitted General Washington and the Americans lost the battle September 11th, 1777.

Slide Show of my Photographs, December 2011

The image, Washington’s Headquarters – Benjamin Ring House, is subject to copyright by Edna Barney. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, an administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.

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Fighting for Freedom

October 17, 2008

Revolutionary War Image

It took many patriots and muskets to defend the bridge and prevent the crossing of the Hessians over Assunpink Creek, at the Second Battle of Trenton, during the American War for Independence. In January 1777, south of Trenton, New Jersey, George Washington’s Continental Army and local militias, held a defensive line along the south shore of Assunpink Creek, stretching from the mouth of the creek up to Philip’s Mill. The rebels repelled several charges by British and Hessian soldiers across the stone bridge over the creek, and also repelled an attempt by the enemy to ford the creek near its mouth.

The Reenactors were from Colonel Ogden’s 1st Regt. New Jersey, and the 2nd Regt. New Jersey, from the Second Battle of Trenton Reenactment, during Patriots Week 2007.

The image, Defending The Bridge, is subject to copyright by Mark K_NJ. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, an administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Saratoga, New York

July 24, 2008

Revolutionary War Image

The Saratoga Victory Monument at Schulyerville, New York, commemorates the surrender of British forces during the Battle of Saratoga in 1777.

Learn More: The American Revolution

The Battle of Saratoga was fought in September and October of 1777. It was a decisive American victory which resulted in the surrender of the entire British army that was invading New York from Canada. The picture of the canons is from Saratoga National Historical Park, overlooking the Hudson River Valley, in New York.

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The image, SARATOGA MONUMENT, is subject to copyright by MIKECNY. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


December During the Revolution

December 16, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

December seems to have been an important month for most of the years of the Revolutionary War. The following is from the museum at Mount Vernon, Virginia:

  • December 1776 – Washington crossed the Delaware River and captured Trenton, New Jersey.

  • December 1777 – Washington’s troops entered Winter Camp and Valley Forge, Pennsylvania.

  • December 1778 – Britain carried the war to the southern colonies by occupying Savannah, Georgia.

  • December 1779 – British General Clinton sailed from New York harbor to Charleston, South Carolina with 50,000 troops.

  • December 1783 – General Washington “voluntarily” stepped down as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army.

Learn More: The American Revolution

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The image, Museum at Mount Vernon, is subject to copyright by barneykin. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Happy Birthday Marines

November 10, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

Formal commemoration of the birthday of the Marine Corps was begun on November 10th, 1921. That date was chosen because it was the date that the Second Continental Congress resolved in 1775, to raise two battalions of Continental Marines. The rest is history, as this plaque memorializes the Marines of the Battle of Princeton.

Continental Marines Memorial, Princeton, New Jersey

“DEDICATED TO THE CONTINENTAL MARINES WHO FOUGHT WITH GENERAL WASHINGTON’S TROOPS DURING THE BATTLE OF PRINCETON JANUARY 3, 1777”

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The image, Continental Marines Memorial, is subject to copyright by Mark K_NJ. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Gentleman Johnny Burgoyne

October 2, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

The British knew him as “Gentleman Johnny Burgoyne.” The Contintentals defeated him and his “World’s Greatest Army” at the Battle of Saratoga. On October 17th 1777, British General John Burgoyne (1722–1792) surrendered his army of 6,000 men to the American “Rabble in Arms”.

The blue plaque honors the place where this British military officer, politician and dramatist lived and died: Hertford Street W1, Mayfair, London, England.

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The image, Gentleman Johnny Burgoyne, is subject to copyright by Jamie Barras. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


General Washington Defaced

September 18, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

The Signatures of Evil-Doers and America Haters 

At Brooklyn, New York’s Continental Army Plaza this defaced memorial to General George Washington during the freezing winter of 1777-1778, was photographed on 28 July 2007. This public park was named for the equestrian sculpture of America’s greatest patriot, George Washington (1732-1799). Washington spent his entire adult life in service to his people as a military man and finally as the Commander in Chief and first President of the new United States of America.

The statue of George Washington, created by the renown sculptor Henry Mervin Shrady (1871-1922), was dedicated more than 100 years ago, in 1906. Shrady portrayed General Washington during the horrible six-month encampment with his rebel army at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. That bitterly cold winter took a terrible toll, with an estimated one quarter of Washington’s army perishing, about 2500 men. It was largely because of George Washington’s leadership abilities that his army survived at all.

Washington’s men who suffered and froze to death at Valley Forge made those sacrifices so that “posterity” could someday live free. We are that “posterity”, but are we worthy of such a legacy? Such desecration of a public monument to our country’s founder is unforgiveable. Is there no respect for America’s greatest leader? Is there no help for us to preserve the memory of our forbears? Is there no regard for anything of value in this day and age in America?

Sadly, from this photograph and the one at this site (General Washington Statue), it appears that there has been a constant battle to keep this statue in a respectable condition, as the cleaning and sand-blasting signs show. Because we value freedom and liberty, those who hate and despise America and American values of freedom and liberty, will always be with us, it seems. We will be at war forever against evil doers. 

Continental Army Plaza

Learn More: The American Revolution

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The image, NYC – Brooklyn – Williamsburg: Continental Army Plaza – George Washington at Valley Forge – The Monument, is subject to copyright by wallyg. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.