Women of the Revolution

July 1, 2008

Revolutionary War Image

Yes … there were women in battle during the American Revolution. Some were wives, some were mothers, some were hangers on. The women pictured here are reenacting seamstresses employed in mending or sewing during the sultry New Jersey summer of 1778, at the Battle of Monmouth. It was here on the 27th of June, that one of the Molly Pitchers became famous for joining the fight when her husband was shot while manning a cannon.

Betty Jackson, the mother of future president Andrew Jackson joined the war as a nurse, after two of her sons became infected with smallpox while imprisoned by the British. (See Andrew Jackson in Lafayette Square. )

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The image, Spinsters, is subject to copyright by Mark K_NJ. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.

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Patriot Haym Solomon

January 24, 2008

Revolutionary War Image

Haym Solomon (Salomon) was born in Poland about 1740. At the beginning of America’s Revolution, Mr. Solomon was operating a financial brokerage in New York City. He immediately sided with the Sons of Liberty, and in 1776, was arrested by the British as a spy, and was required to serve them as a German interpreter for Hessian soldiers. However, at the same time he was helping prisoners of the British to escape and encouraging German soldiers to desert. When this was discovered in 1778, the British sentenced him to death. He was able to escape to Philadelphia, which was controlled by the American rebels, and there he resumed his brokerage enterprises.

Solomon was an influential member of the Mikveh Israel congregation, founded in 1740, in Philadelphia and he was a leader in the fight to overturn restrictive Pennsylvania laws barring non-Christians from holding public office. He married Rachel Franks in 1777, and they had four children together.

Haym Solomon performed patriotic service to his adopted land in both New York and Pennsylvania by helping to finance the war. He loaned and contributed large sums of money to the cause of liberty during the American Revolution. He lived at both New York City and Philadelphia and died in that latter city on 6 January 1785, penniless, probably as a result of his loans to the American government. His descendants were never successful in obtaining compensation from Congress for his financial sacrifices.

The remains of Haym Solomon now repose at Mikveh Israel Cemetery. From the photograph, it appears that his grave or place of burial was marked by the Haym Solomon Masonic Lodge in 1976. In the past 100+ years numerous of his female descendants have joined the Daughters of the American Revolution on his service.

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The image, Mikveh Israel Cemetery – Haym Solomon, is subject to copyright by etacar11. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


December During the Revolution

December 16, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

December seems to have been an important month for most of the years of the Revolutionary War. The following is from the museum at Mount Vernon, Virginia:

  • December 1776 – Washington crossed the Delaware River and captured Trenton, New Jersey.

  • December 1777 – Washington’s troops entered Winter Camp and Valley Forge, Pennsylvania.

  • December 1778 – Britain carried the war to the southern colonies by occupying Savannah, Georgia.

  • December 1779 – British General Clinton sailed from New York harbor to Charleston, South Carolina with 50,000 troops.

  • December 1783 – General Washington “voluntarily” stepped down as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army.

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The image, Museum at Mount Vernon, is subject to copyright by barneykin. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Molly Pitcher in Battle

March 17, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

The Battle of Monmouth took place on the 27th of June in 1778. It was at this battle where a Molly Pitcher became famous for fetching pitchers of water in the summer heat for the battle weary soldiers.   

This painting is a “New Deal” mural showing a legendary Molly Pitcher at the Battle of Monmouth. It was commissioned by the United States Treasury Department during the Great Depression and was completed in 1935, by artist, Gerald Foster. Owned by the United States Postal Service, the artwork is currently on loan to the Monmouth Coounty, New Jersey Library where it is on display at the Library’s headquarters.

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The image, Monmouth County Library Headquarters, is subject to copyright by sheena1chi. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.