Cornwallis and Bell’s Mill

November 29, 2006

North Facing Foundation Wall, and Trash Heap

Martha (McFarland) McGee was a widow with five children when she married Captain William Bell in May of 1779. Bell owned Bell’s Mill, circa 1725, located in Randolph County, North Carolina. While Captain Bell, an officer in the North Carolina militia, was away serving his county, his new wife Martha operated the mill.

In 1781, after the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, Lord Cornwallis went ahead to Bell’s Mill to confiscate corn and meal for his army, while he briefly occupied Mrs. Bell’s home as his headquarters.

Mrs. Bell confronted the British general to ask if he was planning to torch the mill when he finished grinding meal for his troops. She told him that if he planned to destroy the mill, that she would to burn it herself. Bell’s Mill was spared and continued in operation.

Martha McFarland McGee Bell was honored at Guilford Court House Battleground with a monument that reads, “Loyal Whig, Enthusiastic Patriot, Revolutionary Heroine“.

Sadly, reports Gary Strader whose photograph of Bell’s Mill is here posted, the historic mill site is now under water. For more information see his web site: “Bell’s Mill

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The image, North Facing Foundation Wall, and Trash Heap, is subject to copyright by gstrader. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Thomas Jefferson Lives On

November 5, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Virginians continue to be enamored of their great son and patriot Thomas Jefferson.  He is remembered everywhere, as here he sits outside a shop in Williamsburg.

When Thomas Jefferson succeeded Patrick Henry as governor of Virginia, in 1780, he agreed to move the capitol from Williamsburg to Richmond, as it was a more central and protected location. However, both Williamsburg and Richmond were soon invaded by the British in full force, as was all of Virginia, in 1781. Although Jefferson was harshly criticized by his foes for leaving Richmond before the onslaught, he did save his neck, and survive to contribute much more to the newly founded nation.

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The image, Thomas Jefferson statue at Merchants Sq., is subject to copyright by jeffq. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Yorktown Day 2006

October 21, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

October 19th, 2006

Yorktown, Virginia’s 225th commemoration of the Victory at Yorktown on 19 October 1781, celebrating the final battle of the American Revolution that secured independence for the United States.

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The image, 100_0753.JPG, is subject to copyright by Haobaba. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Yorktown Victory Monument

October 19, 2006

flickr
The Seige of Yorktown, led by General George Washington, ended with the surrender of General Cornwallis and his army of 17,600 on October 19, 1781. Upon hearing of the defeat the British Prime Minister, Frederick Lord North, exclaimed, “Oh God, it’s all over.”The victory at Yorktown effectively ended the war.

The image, Yorktown, was originally uploaded by Alan Hostetler. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr favorites.


French Grave Marker

October 13, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Unknown Soldiers
Yorktown Battlefield, Yorktown, Virginia
October 1781

In October 1971, a white Carrara marble cross was erected at the site known as the ‘French Cemetary’. For many years prior to 1971, the site had been marked by a simple wooden cross. This site is located about a mile to the south of ‘The French Trench’, and was known to have contained the remains of at least fifty unknown French soldiers who were believed to have died during the 1781 siege.  (Commemoration of French at Yorktown)

The image, 100_1189, was originally uploaded by DanRhett. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr.


Historic Yorktown, Virginia

October 12, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Yorktown Day is celebrated annually at Yorktown, Virginia on October 19th. The holiday memorializes the surrender of the British forces on the 19th of October 1781, ending the Battle of Yorktown and bringing about the end of the American Revolutionary War. This year’s Yorktown Day celebration is special because it marks 225 years since the earth-shattering event.

During a typical Yorktown Day events include a parade, speeches from various patriotic groups such as the Daughters of the American Revolution, wreath-laying at gravesites in the area, and reenactments of the Battle and the surrender.

2006 Schedule of Events

October 19-22 – Yorktown 225th Weekend (Yorktown Battlefield).
Celebrating 400 years fo the American military, this four-day event will commemorate the 225th anniversary of the final battle of the American Revolution that secured indenpendence for the United States. Special programs and tours include military encampments, band concerts, fireworks and a waterfront festival. Colonial National Historical Park, Yorktown, VA, (757) 898-2410. Free.

October 19 – Yorktown Day (Yorktown Battlefield).
Ceremonies, a parade and tactical demonstrations by the Commander-i-Chief’s Guard commemorate the 225rd anniversary of America’s climactic Revolutionary War victory at Yorktown. Jointly sponsored by the National Park Service and the Yorktown Day Association. Colonial National Historical Park, Yorktown, VA, (757) 898-2410. Free.

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The image, 100_0643, is subject to copyright by DanRhett. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


600-Mile March To Victory

August 29, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

On August 27, 2006, on North Maple Avenue, Basking Ridge, New Jersey, these hearty and happy reenactors were marching on to victory in Virginia. This summer marks the 225th anniversary of the 600-mile march from Rhode Island to Virginia that led to the siege at Yorktown and ended with the spectacular military victory that finally convinced the British to leave the old colony. The end of the Revolutionary War came two years later.

It’s a singular event in American history — that you have thousands of troops of an allied power on American soil,” said historian Robert Selig, who has worked with the National Park Service and the New Jersey Historic Trust in researching the routes.

The story is recounted by the Star-Ledger newspaper in “In the Footsteps of Our Forefathers” BY KRISTEN ALLOWAY. She wrote that “The Revolution happened in your backyard, Even if it was just for a few days in 1781 and 1782.” INDEED, it is true for me, as I live very near the well marked route that Rochambeau and his French army travelled on their way to Yorktown. See Washington-Rochambeau Route, 2005.
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The image, 600-mile march from Rhode Island to Virginia, is subject to copyright by sheena1chi. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.(39)