Founding Father of Canada

August 18, 2008

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The American Revolution and General Benedict Arnold birthed another nation to be, — Canada.

When the American Revolution broke out in 1775, General Washington sent two armies headed by two great American generals to save Quebec City from the British and to conquer British Canada. In the early morning hours of New Year’s Eve, 1775, Generals Richard Montgomery and Benedict Arnold marched to Quebec and launched a dramatic nighttime assault.
 
Tragically General Montgomery was killed in battle. Although Benedict Arnold was severely wounded, his tenacious troops fought their way into Quebec City where they scaled the barricade that defended the lower town. Behind the barricade, British regulars and French and English militia met them to battle, and successfully defend their city from the Americans.
 
Today in Canada, Canadian students barely study the American Revolution, as Canadian educators consider it to be an event in the land of their behemoth Southerly neighbor. Yet, if Generals Washington, Montgomery and Arnold had succeeded, Canada as it is today, would not exist. Undoubtedly, the British lands would have been conquered and become part of the new nation of the United States. Instead, those lands became populated by Loyalist refugees from the new United States, where they created the provinces of Upper Canada (Ontario) and New Brunswick. Almost one hundred years later, in 1867, the British colonies that Benedict Arnold had failed to capture, came together to form the Dominion of Canada.
 
Hence, in a round-about way, American patriot turned traitor, General Benedict Arnold, by his failure at conquest, may in fact be, the “Founding Father of Canada.” 

Learn More: The American Revolution

The image, IMG_0697.JPG, is subject to copyright by danielpennypacker. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.

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General Richard Montgomery

November 4, 2007

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“to transmit to Posterity a grateful remembrance of the patriotism conduct enterprize & perseverance of Major General RICHARD MONTGOMERY”

Directly across from what once was the World Trade Center, Saint Paul’s Chapel still stands in New York City . There is a memorial at the east window to Brigadier General Richard Montgomery who fell at the Battle of Quebec in 1775, fighting for the Americans.

The memorial plaque was erected just a few months after the American army’s great loss of General Montgomery. It reads:

This Monument is erected by the order of CONGRESS 25th Janry 1776 to transmit to Posterity a grateful remembrance of the patriotism conduct enterprize & perseverance of Major General RICHARD MONTGOMERY Who after a series of successes amidst the most discouraging Difficulties FELL in the attack on QUEBEC 31st Decbr 1775. Aged 37 Years.

At the start of the rebellion, the Americans had plans to conquer the British colony of Canada. On November 13, 1775, General Richard Montgomery led American troops in an attempt to capture the city of Montreal. Later that year, General George Washington ordered Benedict Arnold to capture Quebec. Things did not go well for the rebels, as Montgomery was killed, Arnold, severely wounded, and Canada remained in the hands of the British.

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The image, NYC – St. Paul’s Chapel – Montgomery Memorial, is subject to copyright by wallyg. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.