Graves at Old Tennent Church

November 29, 2008

Revolutionary War Image

The lovely Old Tennent Church sits atop a hill in the middle of its cemetery in Tennent or Manalapan, New Jersey. The original Presbyterian congregation was organized about 1692, and met in a log structure. The third structure, seen here, was built in 1751, and was twenty-seven years old at the time of the Battle of Monmouth. On Sunday, June 28, 1778, General George Washington, with about six thousand men, passed by the Old Tennent Church. That morning Washington had been at Englishtown where, from the sound of cannons firing, he understood that his advance forces under General Lee were battling the British. One hundred yards beyond the church door Washington met the first straggler who told him that Lee had retreated from the British. A few yards more and the General came upon Lee himself in retreat. Washington sternly rebuked his General, hastened forward, and rallied the retreating Continentals. The renewed battle continued until evening when the British were driven back. During the night to Washington’s surprise, the British retired. This victory by the rebels, snatched from the jaws of defeat, gave new hope and courage to the American colonials.

The church was used as a field hospital during the Battle of Monmouth, when wounded soldiers were carried to the church where members of the congregation tended them. The battle was so near that walls of the church are riddled with holes from cannonballs. The pews still bear scars of the surgeon’s saw and bloodstains of the wounded and dying. Those Revolutionary War soldiers who died at the hospital are buried in the cemetery, along with British soldiers. There are antique cannons on the grounds. An active congregation continues worshipping at the Old Tennent Church.

The image, When You Think About It, The Revolution Wasn’t That Long Ago., is subject to copyright by Sister72. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, an administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Battle of Kettle Creek

July 20, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Revolutionary War Cemetery, Wilkes County, Georgia

The Battle of Kettle Creek, fought here on February 14, 1779, was one of the most important battles of the Revolutionary War in Georgia.

The image, Battle of Kettle Creek, Wilkes County, GA, was originally uploaded at Flickr by Robert 345. It is posted here by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Yorktown Battlefield Cemetery

July 19, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Yorktown, Virginia

The image, Memorial Day, was originally uploaded at Flickr by StJohns/VaBeach. It is posted here by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Joshua Younger, Patriot

July 7, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Revolutionary War Marker of Joshua Younger (1755-1834), Leatherwood Cemetary, Bedford, Indiana.

The image, Joshua Younger headstone, was originally uploaded at Flickr by KimberlyD. It is posted here by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool..


Lieutenant Thomas Hardy

June 20, 2006

flickr

"Erected to the memory of Lieut. Thomas Hardy, who died July 25, 1816, age  60." Revolutionary War Veteran Grave, Town Cemetery – Dublin, New Hampshire

The image, Lieutenant Thomas Hardy, was originally uploaded by IntoTheLens. It is posted here from Neddy's flickr favorites.


Captain Samuel Rice

June 14, 2006

flickr

The gravestone of Samuel Rice (1751-1802) is at the Saint John's Episcopal Church Cemetery in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. It has a county marker designating him as "a veteran".

The image, Captain Samuel Rice, was originally uploaded by IntoTheLens. It is posted here from Neddy's flickr favorites.


Pigeon Top Mountain

April 15, 2006

Pigeon Top Mountain

Civil War era map showing Pigeon Top Mountain in Albemarle County, Virginia, from the Library of Congress collection. Revolutionary War soldier William VIA and his wife, Mary (Craig) VIA are buried here at their homestead in graves marked only with fieldstones.

The image, Pigeon Top Mountain, was originally uploaded by barneykin. It is posted here from Neddy's flickr favorites.