General Thaddeus Kosciuszko

February 3, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

The monument to General Thaddeus Kosciuszko is located at Cooper River Park, Pennsauken, New Jersey.

Thaddeus Kosciuszko had come to America as a young man from Poland to offer his skills to the Revolutionary army. His life has got to be one of the most interesting of the American Revolution characters.

Kościuszko had been born in Lithuania-Poland and very well educated in military art and engineering. After the conquest of his country and the resulting cutbacks of its military, he went abroad where he was recruited in France by Silas Deane and Benjamin Franklin to help their American cause for freedom. In August of 1776, he arrived in America and began service as a volunteer. On 18 October 1776, Congress commissioned him as a Colonel of Engineers in the Continental Army, where he eventually became the head engineer.

While serving with the Continental Army, he read the Declaration of Independence and was greatly affected by it, as he found that it encompassed everything that he himself had always believed. Thereafter, he became a kindred spirit of the author of the Declaration, Thomas Jefferson, and spent many visits at Jefferson’s Virginia home, Monticello.

Kościuszko’s efforts added greatly to the American army. After the battle of Ticonderoga, General Washington put him in charge of military engineering at West Point, New York. Eventually Kosciuszko requested service with the Southern Army where he contributed even more to American victories.

After seven years of service, on 13 October 1783, Kościuszko, considered one of the greatest engineers in America, was granted American citizenship and promoted to Brigadier General. He was also admitted to the prestigious Society of the Cincinnati, one of only three foreigners allowed entrance.

See Wikipedia’s Tadeusz Kościuszko.

See Flickr photographers:
magarell
etacar11
sheenachi

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General Von Steuben

October 27, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Friedrich Wilhelm August von Steuben was born 17 September 1730, in Magdeburg, Prussia, and died 1794, in New York. If I am reading the German writing correctly, this plaque and statue of the great patriot general of the American Revolution is located in Potsdam, Germany.

Baron Von Steuben was born into a military family. He played a crucial role in the military success of the American Revolution. He had joined the Prussian army at the age of sixteen and served until the end of the Seven Years War. Rising to the rank of captain, he was for a time attached to the staff of Fredrick the Great. With his forceful Prussian bearing and colorful personality, Steuben had a wondrous effect on the downhearted Continental army, becoming one of General George Washington’s most valuable and trusted officers. He was charged to train the army as an efficient fighting machine, which he did, despite the fact that he spoke no English.

Baron Von Steuben

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Von Steuben

October 27, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

GENERAL FRIEDRICH WILHELM AUGUST VON STEUBEN

The “von” was added to the STEUBEN family name in 1708, by grandfather Augustin Steuben who was a minister with the German Reformed Church. Steuben was baptised with the name “Friedrich Wilhelm Ludolf Gerhard Augustin von Steuben” which he changed to “Friedrich Wilhelm August Heinrich Ferdinand.” The title of Baron was awarded to him in 1764, after he became chamberlain at the petty court of Hohenzollern-Hechingen. He had already been in military service, having been dismissed, reasons unknown, in 1763, with the rank of Captain.

Steuben came to the colonies, after presenting his credentials to Benjamin Franklin in France. He had royal connections in his homeland and had been part of the General Staff during the Seven Years War. He even served diplomatically in Russia. His military experience had been significant enough to greatly improve the quality of the Continental Army after Valley Forge.

It is always a wonder to find our own American patriots of the Revolution honored also in lands far across the sea.  Of course, it should be thus, as it was the Revolution that “fired the shot heard ’round the world.” If I am reading the German writing correctly, this statue of the great patriot general of the American Revolution is located in Potsdam, Germany.

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The image, Steuben-Denkmal, is subject to copyright by SteffenKahl. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Andrew Jackson in Lafayette Square

August 5, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Although Andrew Jackson’s most famous military service was during the War of 1812, it was the American Revolution which honed his intense dislike of the British. That war for independence took a horrendous toll upon the Jackson family.

Andrew was only nine years old when The Declaration of Independence was signed. As soon as he was thirteen he joined up with the Continentals as a courier. All three of the Jackson boys saw active duty military service. His older brother, Hugh Jackson, died after the Battle of Stono Ferry, South Carolina in 1779. In April of 1781, the remaining two Jackson brothers were taken as prisoners by the British. While in captivity a British officer ordered them to clean his boots, which both boys refused to do. The officer struck them with his sword and Andrew’s hand was cut to the bone and his face scarred for life.

The young boy never forgot this ill treatment at British hands. The future American General and President, Andrew Jackson, forever harbored a bitter resentment towards anything British.

During their two month imprisonment by the enemy, both brothers became infected with smallpox, from which Robert Jackson perished. Shortly thereafter, their mother, Betty Jackson, went to Charleston to nurse other American prisoners of war, where she was soon stricken with either ship fever or cholera and died. At age fourteen, Andrew Jackson found himself an orphan and an only child.

However heavy the burden of adversity was for the young unschooled Andrew, he triumphed, becoming an American legend as both a warrior and a president. Andrew Jackson is also historically known for being:

• The first president born in a log cabin.
• The first president nominated by a political party.
• The first president to ride on a railroad train.
• The first president victimized by an assassination attempt.
• The only president to have been a prisoner of war.
• The last president who was a veteran of the Revolutonary War.

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Cambridge Commons

June 22, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

"Under this tree at WASHINGTON first took command OF THE AMERICAN ARMY July 3rd 1775" This memorial to General George Washington is at Cambridge Commons in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

The image, Cambridge_Cambridge Commons_Washington took command, was originally uploaded by wallyg. It is posted here from Neddy's flickr favorites posted at "The Revolution Flickred".