December During the Revolution

December 16, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

December seems to have been an important month for most of the years of the Revolutionary War. The following is from the museum at Mount Vernon, Virginia:

  • December 1776 – Washington crossed the Delaware River and captured Trenton, New Jersey.

  • December 1777 – Washington’s troops entered Winter Camp and Valley Forge, Pennsylvania.

  • December 1778 – Britain carried the war to the southern colonies by occupying Savannah, Georgia.

  • December 1779 – British General Clinton sailed from New York harbor to Charleston, South Carolina with 50,000 troops.

  • December 1783 – General Washington “voluntarily” stepped down as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army.

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The image, Museum at Mount Vernon, is subject to copyright by barneykin. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Happy Birthday Marines

November 10, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

Formal commemoration of the birthday of the Marine Corps was begun on November 10th, 1921. That date was chosen because it was the date that the Second Continental Congress resolved in 1775, to raise two battalions of Continental Marines. The rest is history, as this plaque memorializes the Marines of the Battle of Princeton.

Continental Marines Memorial, Princeton, New Jersey

“DEDICATED TO THE CONTINENTAL MARINES WHO FOUGHT WITH GENERAL WASHINGTON’S TROOPS DURING THE BATTLE OF PRINCETON JANUARY 3, 1777”

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The image, Continental Marines Memorial, is subject to copyright by Mark K_NJ. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus

May 25, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

Many of the military officers of the American Revolution patterned their service on the life of this ancient legendary Roman, Cincinnatus, of 458 BC, who left his farm at the call of his country during a war emergency. At the ending of the Revolutionary War, the Society of the Cincinnati was formed by many of these first American “citizen soldiers” with General George Washington as the society’s first president. The Ohio city of Cincinnati was named in honor of the Society by its founder who was a member of the prestigious organization.

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The image, Cincinnati – Sawyer Point: Cincinnatus Statue, is subject to copyright by wallyg. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


America’s First and Greatest Hero

February 22, 2007

“First in war, first in peace, first in the hearts of his countrymen.”

Revolutionary War Image

George WASHINGTON (1732 – 1799) was born on February 22, 1732, at “Popes Creek”, a home that his father had built in the 1720s in Westmoreland County, Virginia. In 1770, “Popes Creek” was renamed “Wakefield”, and on Christmas Day of 1779, Washington’s birthplace burned to the ground, leaving only the crushed oyster shell foundation remaining. George Washington was raised there and in Fairfax and King George Counties, Virginia.

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The image, Wakefield Historical Marker, is subject to copyright by jeffq. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Mount Rushmore Carving

February 19, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

George Washington, America’s first and greatest president, is one of four American presidents carved into the granite at Mount Rushmore, South Dakota.

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The image, George W., is subject to copyright by bridgepix. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


The Washington Tomb

February 17, 2007

Washington Tomb

Tomb Entrance, Mount Vernon, Virginia

George Washington died in his bedroom at Mount Vernon on December 14th, 1799. His will directed that he be buried on the grounds of his beloved estate where he had selected a site for a new brick tomb to replace the original burial vault which was badly weathered and succumbing to the elements. However, the new tomb was not completed until more than thirty years later. It was in 1831, that the earthly remains of George and Martha were removed there. Every day from April through October a wreath laying ceremony is performed at 10 am and 2 pm in tribute to America’s greatest leader.

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The image, Washington Tomb, is subject to copyright by barneykin. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Washington’s Obelisk

February 15, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

A grateful nation remembered a great patriot, warrior and president, George Washington of Mount Vernon, Virginia, by erecting this great obelisk to his memory in their nation’s capital. George Washington’s birthday once was celebrated in this land with great fanfare on February 22nd. Today George Washington’s birthday seems to have been forgotten or remembered only as “Presidents’ Day”, while men of lesser importance to our nation’s birth are accorded a day unto themselves.

However, not everyone has forgotten the greatness of the man Washington. At his old plantation home on the Potomac River, General George Washington will be receiving birthday greetings in person, as he did so graciously in olden times. MountVernon.org

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The image, Midnight Obelisk – The Washington Monument, is subject to copyright by Stuck in Customs. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.