Ben Adam GALLUP

June 12, 2008

Revolutionary War Image

Colonel Ben Adam GALLUP (Benadam GALLUP) was a Revolutionary War patriot. He was born and died at Groton, New London County, Connecticut. He married Hannah AVERY. In 1776, he was serving as a Lieutenant Colonel for the Revolutionary cause. His earthy remains lie in the Gallup Hill Burying Ground at Ledyard, Connecticut.

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The image, Col. Benadam GALLUP, is subject to copyright by midgefrazel. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Patriot Haym Solomon

January 24, 2008

Revolutionary War Image

Haym Solomon (Salomon) was born in Poland about 1740. At the beginning of America’s Revolution, Mr. Solomon was operating a financial brokerage in New York City. He immediately sided with the Sons of Liberty, and in 1776, was arrested by the British as a spy, and was required to serve them as a German interpreter for Hessian soldiers. However, at the same time he was helping prisoners of the British to escape and encouraging German soldiers to desert. When this was discovered in 1778, the British sentenced him to death. He was able to escape to Philadelphia, which was controlled by the American rebels, and there he resumed his brokerage enterprises.

Solomon was an influential member of the Mikveh Israel congregation, founded in 1740, in Philadelphia and he was a leader in the fight to overturn restrictive Pennsylvania laws barring non-Christians from holding public office. He married Rachel Franks in 1777, and they had four children together.

Haym Solomon performed patriotic service to his adopted land in both New York and Pennsylvania by helping to finance the war. He loaned and contributed large sums of money to the cause of liberty during the American Revolution. He lived at both New York City and Philadelphia and died in that latter city on 6 January 1785, penniless, probably as a result of his loans to the American government. His descendants were never successful in obtaining compensation from Congress for his financial sacrifices.

The remains of Haym Solomon now repose at Mikveh Israel Cemetery. From the photograph, it appears that his grave or place of burial was marked by the Haym Solomon Masonic Lodge in 1976. In the past 100+ years numerous of his female descendants have joined the Daughters of the American Revolution on his service.

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The image, Mikveh Israel Cemetery – Haym Solomon, is subject to copyright by etacar11. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Remembering Solomon Titus

August 31, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

It would be quite a wonderful happening if all descendants found and marked the graves of their Revolutionary War ancestors. One does not have to be a member of SAR nor DAR to do so. One has only to verify that it is the burial site of a specific soldier who fought during the war, and the American government will provide a marker.

Solomon Titus and his wife, Susanna Reed, are buried at Pennington Presbyterian Church, 13 South Main Street, Pennington, New Jersey 08534.

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The image, Pennington Presbyterian Church, is subject to copyright by Sheena 2.0™. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Patriots’ Graves

April 2, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

This cemetery in Louisville, Georgia is the final resting place of American patriots of the Revolutionary War.  At the Flickr group, “The Revolution Flickred” we are collecting images of gravesites of these patriots, which can be viewed here: Patriot Graves of ’76.

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The image, Louisville, GA, is subject to copyright by Robert 345. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Elbridge Gerry

March 21, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

Elbridge GERRY (1744-1814) of Massachusetts is the only signer of the Declaration of Independence who is buried in Washington, DC. He also had signed the Articles of Confederation. He served as governor of Massachusetts and as the fifth Vice President of the United States, under James MADISON.

He is most interestingly know for being the namesake of the word and political act of “gerrymandering”.

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The image, Elbridge Gerry, is subject to copyright by dbking. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Patriots’ Graves

March 18, 2007

Revolutionary War Image 

Revolutionary War Graveyard in Salem, New York.

After the Battle of Saratoga in 1777, according to local legend, about 100 soldiers’ bodies were loaded like “cord wood” onto wagons and brought to Salem’s burying grounds and placed in a common grave. In addition, this cemetery contains documented remains of 101 soldiers and veterans of the American Revolution, making it probably the cemetery with the greatest number of Revolutionary War soldiers in New York State.

Listing of the Soldier Burials

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The image, FALLEN SOLDIERS, is subject to copyright by MIKECNY. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Father of the Constitution

August 16, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Gravestone of James and Dolley (Payne) Madison, Montpelier, Virginia

James Madison (1751-1836), was best known as “The Father of the Constitution”, however he lost much of his well deserved prestige after becoming President. When he died in 1836, he was the last surviving signer of the U.S. Constitution. Dolly became the “Madonna” of 19th century America. See “The Dolly Madison Project”.

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The image, James and Dolley Madison, is subject to copyright by Kelly Nigro. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool. (112)