Colonel Edward Hand Reenactment

December 28, 2009

Citizens of Lawrence, exercise your historic rights! On Saturday, January 2, 2010 join the 48TH annual Colonel Hand Historic March. Help us reenact the day in January 1777, when right here in Lawrence (Maidenhead) Township Colonel Edward Hand and his Pennsylvania riflemen delayed over 6,000 British troops. This delay saved the day for General Washington and the entire Continental Army (the patriots). Arrive at the Lawrence Township Municipal Building (Maidenhead Court House) located at 2207 Lawrenceville Road (Route 206) at 10:00 am. Meet his excellency General George Washington, the marching Mayor, a Pennsylvania Rifleman and Colonel Edward Hand. Even if you are not quite ready to delay the British, come to the program from 10:00 am to 10:40 am. There will be a memorial tribute to march founder Bob Immordino including the canon firing by Coryell’s Militia. All marchers will enjoy cider, donuts, cookies and tricorner pastries at the end of the march. Return transportation will be provided. Learn more about the pivotal role played by Lawrence Township in molding our nation. What happened here 233 years ago changed the course American history.

The above press release is from: Township of Lawrence, Mercer County, New Jersey


Battle of Iron Works Hill

December 17, 2008

In December 1776, after significant victories over the Americans, the British army, resting upon its laurels, went into winter quarters in New York and New Jersey. The British wrongly assumed that Washington’s forces in Pennsylvania were also in winter quarters.

On December 17th, General Washington ordered 600 of his forces, mostly untrained men and boys from nearby towns augmented by two companies of Virginia soldiers, to cross the Delaware River and march via Moorestown to Mount Holly, New Jersey.  At Mount Holly the rebels set up a few “3-pounder” artillery pieces on Iron Works Hill, causing the Hessian commanders at Black Horse and Bordentown to believe they were being opposed by 3,000 men. By Christmas Eve, Washington’s plan had lured 2,000 Hessians to the The Mount in Mount Holly, to engage the supposed “thousands” of rebel forces occupying Iron Works Hill. Then at nighttime, while the Hessians were making merry, indulging in the confiscated contents of a local brewery, the Americans stealthily evacuated their positions and marched to Moorestown. On December 26, Washington’s army was able to wax victorious at the Battle of Trenton, capturing 1,000 prisoners. Part of that victory by the Americans is attributed to Washington’s plan a week earlier at the Battle of Iron Works Hill.

I am sorry to report that the photograph that was here of the reenactment of the Battle of Iron Works Hill in Mount Holly, New Jersey that took place on 13 December 2008, has been removed from Flickr’s public viewing.


Graves at Old Tennent Church

November 29, 2008

Revolutionary War Image

The lovely Old Tennent Church sits atop a hill in the middle of its cemetery in Tennent or Manalapan, New Jersey. The original Presbyterian congregation was organized about 1692, and met in a log structure. The third structure, seen here, was built in 1751, and was twenty-seven years old at the time of the Battle of Monmouth. On Sunday, June 28, 1778, General George Washington, with about six thousand men, passed by the Old Tennent Church. That morning Washington had been at Englishtown where, from the sound of cannons firing, he understood that his advance forces under General Lee were battling the British. One hundred yards beyond the church door Washington met the first straggler who told him that Lee had retreated from the British. A few yards more and the General came upon Lee himself in retreat. Washington sternly rebuked his General, hastened forward, and rallied the retreating Continentals. The renewed battle continued until evening when the British were driven back. During the night to Washington’s surprise, the British retired. This victory by the rebels, snatched from the jaws of defeat, gave new hope and courage to the American colonials.

The church was used as a field hospital during the Battle of Monmouth, when wounded soldiers were carried to the church where members of the congregation tended them. The battle was so near that walls of the church are riddled with holes from cannonballs. The pews still bear scars of the surgeon’s saw and bloodstains of the wounded and dying. Those Revolutionary War soldiers who died at the hospital are buried in the cemetery, along with British soldiers. There are antique cannons on the grounds. An active congregation continues worshipping at the Old Tennent Church.

The image, When You Think About It, The Revolution Wasn’t That Long Ago., is subject to copyright by Sister72. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, an administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Fighting for Freedom

October 17, 2008

Revolutionary War Image

It took many patriots and muskets to defend the bridge and prevent the crossing of the Hessians over Assunpink Creek, at the Second Battle of Trenton, during the American War for Independence. In January 1777, south of Trenton, New Jersey, George Washington’s Continental Army and local militias, held a defensive line along the south shore of Assunpink Creek, stretching from the mouth of the creek up to Philip’s Mill. The rebels repelled several charges by British and Hessian soldiers across the stone bridge over the creek, and also repelled an attempt by the enemy to ford the creek near its mouth.

The Reenactors were from Colonel Ogden’s 1st Regt. New Jersey, and the 2nd Regt. New Jersey, from the Second Battle of Trenton Reenactment, during Patriots Week 2007.

The image, Defending The Bridge, is subject to copyright by Mark K_NJ. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, an administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Grave of a Daughter

February 11, 2008

Revolutionary War Image

Myrtle Grimm Ferris was the descendant of a Patriot of the American Revolution, and her gravesite has been marked by the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, of which she was a member.

Her obituary tells that she was living in Pennington, New Jersey when she died. She was the wife of Frederick L. Ferris, a distinguished newspaper man. She, herself was the Pennington correspondent for the Evening Times for more than 30 years. Mrs. Ferris had served as Regent of the Penelope Heart Chapter of Pennington. She further served the Society on the House Committee for NSDAR’s Continental Congress, as state chairman of Conferences for the New Jersey Society as state chairman for press relations for the New Jersey Society, state librarian, and state chairman of the Good Citizens Committee.

Learn More: The American Revolution

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The image, Frederick Lum Ferris & Myrtle Grimm Ferris, is subject to copyright by Sheena 2.0™. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Remembering Solomon Titus

August 31, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

It would be quite a wonderful happening if all descendants found and marked the graves of their Revolutionary War ancestors. One does not have to be a member of SAR nor DAR to do so. One has only to verify that it is the burial site of a specific soldier who fought during the war, and the American government will provide a marker.

Solomon Titus and his wife, Susanna Reed, are buried at Pennington Presbyterian Church, 13 South Main Street, Pennington, New Jersey 08534.

Learn More: The American Revolution

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The image, Pennington Presbyterian Church, is subject to copyright by Sheena 2.0™. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Watching the Crossing

January 21, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

Six months after celebrating the signing of the Declaration of Independence, George Washington’s army was nearly vanquished. He had lost ninety percent of his men and the American Revolution was almost lost. The world’s most powerful military had routed the Americans at New York, was in occupation of three of the new American states, and it was marching on Philadelphia. When George Washington was driven across the Delaware River, panic and despair was abroad throughout the new republic.

However, General Washington, and some others, did now allow the ‘Spirit of 76’ to die. As British and Hessian troops marched across New Jersey, the people of that former colony took a stand against them. On Christmas night of 1776, when a terrible winter storm struck, George Washington saw opportunity. He led his men back across the Delaware River where they ferociously attacked the Hessian troops at Trenton, killing and capturing nearly one thousand soldiers. A second battle of Trenton followed within days and then, when Lord Cornwallis counterattacked with his very best troops, the Americans held them off. Giving no quarter, under cover of night, Washington sent his men behind the enemy’s lines and struck them again, defeating them at Princeton, New Jersey. After twelve weeks of fighting in the dead of winter, the British army was severely damaged, its strategy ruined, and the psche of its leaders broadly shaken. New Jersey was freed from British hold.

Learn More: The American Revolution

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The image, Young and old are called for duty, is subject to copyright by nancydowd. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Signer John Hart

October 21, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

John ‘Honest John‘ Hart (circa 1713–May 11, 1779), was a New Jersey signer of the United States Declaration of Independence. Shortly thereafter, in December of 1776, British forces arrived at Pennington, New Jersey and raided Hart’s home in Hopewell, in the process damaging his farm. The elderly John Hart escaped and hid in the Sourland Mountains during the depth of winter. His two minor children managed to escape to nearby family members.

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The image, Hopewell, NJ, is subject to copyright by sheena1chi. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Doctor John Witherspoon

October 18, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

John Witherspoon (1723-1794), Signer of the Declaration of Independence

This statue of the Scottish born Doctor John Witherspoon was dedicated on November 10, 2001, in front of East Pyne Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey. Google Map

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The image, Statue of Dr. John Witherspoon, is subject to copyright by sheena1chi. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


600-Mile March To Victory

August 29, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

On August 27, 2006, on North Maple Avenue, Basking Ridge, New Jersey, these hearty and happy reenactors were marching on to victory in Virginia. This summer marks the 225th anniversary of the 600-mile march from Rhode Island to Virginia that led to the siege at Yorktown and ended with the spectacular military victory that finally convinced the British to leave the old colony. The end of the Revolutionary War came two years later.

It’s a singular event in American history — that you have thousands of troops of an allied power on American soil,” said historian Robert Selig, who has worked with the National Park Service and the New Jersey Historic Trust in researching the routes.

The story is recounted by the Star-Ledger newspaper in “In the Footsteps of Our Forefathers” BY KRISTEN ALLOWAY. She wrote that “The Revolution happened in your backyard, Even if it was just for a few days in 1781 and 1782.” INDEED, it is true for me, as I live very near the well marked route that Rochambeau and his French army travelled on their way to Yorktown. See Washington-Rochambeau Route, 2005.
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The image, 600-mile march from Rhode Island to Virginia, is subject to copyright by sheena1chi. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.(39)