Tales of Revolution

August 31, 2008

Revolutionary War Image

Slideshow of The Battle of White Plains

During September and October of 1776, rebel troops led by George Washington who was seeking the safety of higher ground, took up positions in the hills of the New York village of White Plains. They were being hotly pursued by British and Hessian troops under command of General Sir William Howe, who attacked the Americans on October 28th. The Battle of White Plains was fought primarily on Chatterton Hill, located west of a swamp in the Bronx River Valley, which is now the downtown area of White Plains. Washington, seeing that the Americans were greatly outnumbered, retreated on 31 October 1776.

When the dance was at an end, Ichabod was attracted to a knot of the sager folks, who, with Old Van Tassel, sat smoking at one end of the piazza, gossiping over former times, and drawing out long stories about the war.

“This neighborhood, at the time of which I am speaking, was one of those highly favored places which abound with chronicle and great men. The British and American line had run near it during the war; it had, therefore, been the scene of marauding and infested with refugees, cowboys, and all kinds of border chivalry. Just sufficient time had elapsed to enable each storyteller to dress up his tale with a little becoming fiction, and, in the indistinctness of his recollection, to make himself the hero of every exploit.

“There was the story of Doffue Martling, a large blue-bearded Dutchman, who had nearly taken a British frigate with an old iron nine-pounder from a mud breastwork, only that his gun burst at the sixth discharge. And there was an old gentleman who shall be nameless, being too rich a mynheer to be lightly mentioned, who, in the battle of White Plains, being an excellent master of defence, parried a musket-ball with a small sword, insomuch that he absolutely felt it whiz round the blade, and glance off at the hilt; in proof of which he was ready at any time to show the sword, with the hilt a little bent. There were several more that had been equally great in the field, not one of whom but was persuaded that he had a considerable hand in bringing the war to a happy termination.” (THE LEGEND OF SLEEPY HOLLOW by Washington Irving)

The image, BackShot, is subject to copyright by Snowshoeman. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, an administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.

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Saratoga, New York

July 24, 2008

Revolutionary War Image

The Saratoga Victory Monument at Schulyerville, New York, commemorates the surrender of British forces during the Battle of Saratoga in 1777.

Learn More: The American Revolution

The Battle of Saratoga was fought in September and October of 1777. It was a decisive American victory which resulted in the surrender of the entire British army that was invading New York from Canada. The picture of the canons is from Saratoga National Historical Park, overlooking the Hudson River Valley, in New York.

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The image, SARATOGA MONUMENT, is subject to copyright by MIKECNY. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


General Richard Montgomery

November 4, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

“to transmit to Posterity a grateful remembrance of the patriotism conduct enterprize & perseverance of Major General RICHARD MONTGOMERY”

Directly across from what once was the World Trade Center, Saint Paul’s Chapel still stands in New York City . There is a memorial at the east window to Brigadier General Richard Montgomery who fell at the Battle of Quebec in 1775, fighting for the Americans.

The memorial plaque was erected just a few months after the American army’s great loss of General Montgomery. It reads:

This Monument is erected by the order of CONGRESS 25th Janry 1776 to transmit to Posterity a grateful remembrance of the patriotism conduct enterprize & perseverance of Major General RICHARD MONTGOMERY Who after a series of successes amidst the most discouraging Difficulties FELL in the attack on QUEBEC 31st Decbr 1775. Aged 37 Years.

At the start of the rebellion, the Americans had plans to conquer the British colony of Canada. On November 13, 1775, General Richard Montgomery led American troops in an attempt to capture the city of Montreal. Later that year, General George Washington ordered Benedict Arnold to capture Quebec. Things did not go well for the rebels, as Montgomery was killed, Arnold, severely wounded, and Canada remained in the hands of the British.

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The image, NYC – St. Paul’s Chapel – Montgomery Memorial, is subject to copyright by wallyg. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


General Washington Defaced

September 18, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

The Signatures of Evil-Doers and America Haters 

At Brooklyn, New York’s Continental Army Plaza this defaced memorial to General George Washington during the freezing winter of 1777-1778, was photographed on 28 July 2007. This public park was named for the equestrian sculpture of America’s greatest patriot, George Washington (1732-1799). Washington spent his entire adult life in service to his people as a military man and finally as the Commander in Chief and first President of the new United States of America.

The statue of George Washington, created by the renown sculptor Henry Mervin Shrady (1871-1922), was dedicated more than 100 years ago, in 1906. Shrady portrayed General Washington during the horrible six-month encampment with his rebel army at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. That bitterly cold winter took a terrible toll, with an estimated one quarter of Washington’s army perishing, about 2500 men. It was largely because of George Washington’s leadership abilities that his army survived at all.

Washington’s men who suffered and froze to death at Valley Forge made those sacrifices so that “posterity” could someday live free. We are that “posterity”, but are we worthy of such a legacy? Such desecration of a public monument to our country’s founder is unforgiveable. Is there no respect for America’s greatest leader? Is there no help for us to preserve the memory of our forbears? Is there no regard for anything of value in this day and age in America?

Sadly, from this photograph and the one at this site (General Washington Statue), it appears that there has been a constant battle to keep this statue in a respectable condition, as the cleaning and sand-blasting signs show. Because we value freedom and liberty, those who hate and despise America and American values of freedom and liberty, will always be with us, it seems. We will be at war forever against evil doers. 

Continental Army Plaza

Learn More: The American Revolution

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The image, NYC – Brooklyn – Williamsburg: Continental Army Plaza – George Washington at Valley Forge – The Monument, is subject to copyright by wallyg. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Artillery Guard Duty

July 1, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

One of the chores of being a soldier is guarding the artillery, such as this patriot of old is performing at historic Mabie House, Rotterdam Junction, New York. The image is from a Revolutionary War reenactment.

The Slide Show

The image, Artillery Guard Duty, is subject to copyright by gsxrt. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.

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Captain Molly Corbin

August 21, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

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The grave of Margaret “Captain Molly” Corbin (1751-1800) is at West Point, New York at the side of the U.S.M.A. Chapel. When the British attacked Fort Washington in 1776, she was wounded in action while substituting for her fallen husband who lay at her side. For her heroism in battle the Congress awarded her a pension. Today, her memorial which was erected in 1926, by the New York Daughters of the American Revolution serves as inspiration for female cadets at all of the military academies. Margaret Corbin at Wikipedia.

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The image, USMA – West Point, NY, is subject to copyright by sheena1chi. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, an administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool. (2)


Solitude at Trinity Church

December 21, 2005

When the British evacuated New York City on November 25, 1783, the Americans marched into New York and stood at parade rest on Broadway near Trinity Church as a salute of 13 guns was fired marking the end of the war. Solitude at Trinity Church, Originally uploaded by Jim in Times Square.