Cornwallis and Bell’s Mill

November 29, 2006

North Facing Foundation Wall, and Trash Heap

Martha (McFarland) McGee was a widow with five children when she married Captain William Bell in May of 1779. Bell owned Bell’s Mill, circa 1725, located in Randolph County, North Carolina. While Captain Bell, an officer in the North Carolina militia, was away serving his county, his new wife Martha operated the mill.

In 1781, after the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, Lord Cornwallis went ahead to Bell’s Mill to confiscate corn and meal for his army, while he briefly occupied Mrs. Bell’s home as his headquarters.

Mrs. Bell confronted the British general to ask if he was planning to torch the mill when he finished grinding meal for his troops. She told him that if he planned to destroy the mill, that she would to burn it herself. Bell’s Mill was spared and continued in operation.

Martha McFarland McGee Bell was honored at Guilford Court House Battleground with a monument that reads, “Loyal Whig, Enthusiastic Patriot, Revolutionary Heroine“.

Sadly, reports Gary Strader whose photograph of Bell’s Mill is here posted, the historic mill site is now under water. For more information see his web site: “Bell’s Mill

Save To: gif ”Digg”

The image, North Facing Foundation Wall, and Trash Heap, is subject to copyright by gstrader. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


William Hamby Grave

July 19, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

William Hamby

NC Militia
Revolutionary War
1744
1840

This Revolutionary War patriot’s grave is located at Cade’s Cove, now inside of the Smoky Mountains National Park. The image, Revolutionary war veteren, was originally uploaded at Flickr by empress e. It is posted here by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


William Hamby

July 9, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Revolutionary War soldier’s grave site, Cade’s Cove, Smoky Mountains National Park, North Carolina

The image, Smoky Mountains National Park, was originally uploaded at Flickr by Adam Bauer. It is posted here by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool. (6)


Saint Philips Anglican Church

January 29, 2006

flickr
Brunswick County, North Carolina, was burned by the British in 1778. The image, Damn long time to build!, was originally uploaded by NC Wench. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr favorites.


Saint Philips Church

January 29, 2006
flickr
Brunswick County, North Carolina

The image,
St. Philips Church, was originally uploaded by NC Wench. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr favorites.


Brunswick County, North Carolina

January 29, 2006
flickr
The brick church was fourteen years in the making and just eight years later, the British burned it to the ground.

I have never understood why Christian soldiers’ would treat the Christian churches of their enemys with so little regard.

The image,
Took 14 years to build and 8 years later the Brits burned it., was originally uploaded by NC Wench. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr favorites.


Saint Philips Church Ruins

January 29, 2006
flickr
The ruins were later used as part of Fort Anderson during the War Between the States.

The image,
It was later used as part of the fort during the Civil War., was originally uploaded by NC Wench. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr favorites.