Brigadier General Casimir Pulaski

November 24, 2009

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Brigadier General Casimir Pulaski (1748-1779) was a young Polish Freedom Fighter who came to America to help George Washington’s Revolutionaries in their fight for liberty. The raised leg of his horse indicates that he was killed in battle. He gave his life to America’s cause at the age of thirty-one.

Brigadier General Casimir Pulaski 1748-1779

“The bronze equestrian statue of Brigadier General Casimir Pulaski, portrays the Revolutionary war hero in the uniform of a Polish cavalry commander. Born in Winiary, Poland on Marych 4, 1748 to a noble family, Pulaski gained prominence in Europe for his role in defending liberty in Poland. Excited by the struggle of the emerging American republic, Pulaski joined in its fight for independence, arriving in Boston in July, 1777.

“Pulaski was given a commission as Brigadier General and chief of cavalry in command of all cavalry of the American forces. He was present at Germantown, Pennsylvania and led his legion at Haddonfield, New Jersey; Egg Harbor, New Jersey; Charleston, South Carolina; and Savannah, Georgia.

“At Savannah, Pulaski was mortally wounded and was taken aboard the American brig, Wasp, where he died and was buried at sea on October 11, 1778. He was 31 years old.

“The statue was designed by the sculptor Kazimierz Chodzinski and architect Albert R. Ross. It was erected in 1910.”

~~From Plaque at the Statue in Pulaski Park, Washington, DC. See More on Casimir Pulaski.

The image, Pulaski Park, is subject to copyright by Edna Barney. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, an administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.

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Ben Adam GALLUP

June 12, 2008

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Colonel Ben Adam GALLUP (Benadam GALLUP) was a Revolutionary War patriot. He was born and died at Groton, New London County, Connecticut. He married Hannah AVERY. In 1776, he was serving as a Lieutenant Colonel for the Revolutionary cause. His earthy remains lie in the Gallup Hill Burying Ground at Ledyard, Connecticut.

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Father of the American Cavalry

March 10, 2008

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“I came here, where freedom is being defended, to serve it, and to live or die for it.”  

General Casimir Pulaski, a man born in a far off land, came to America to serve, and live or die for freedom. He became an American general under General George Washington, and he became the Father of the American Cavalry.

When he arrived in America, the first letter he sent to George Washington, stated “I came here, where freedom is being defended, to serve it, and to live or die for it.”  And die he did, at the age of thirty-two, mortally wounded at the Battle of Savannah, Georgia in 1779. 

It is touching to think of how many mortal souls have fought and died for freedom. Sadness can overwhelm one with the realization that so many of the progeny of freedom fighters such as Pulaski, progeny who live every day of their mortal lives in the bosom of freedom, do not value freedom at all.

The Memorial to General Casimir Pulaski is at Wallington, New Jersey.

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The image, Wallington NJ – Pulaski Memorial, is subject to copyright by Sheena 2.0™. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Sail Fast In Harm’s Way

February 6, 2008

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John Paul Jones – Father of the American Navy: “Sail fast, for I intend to go in harm’s way.”

This monument of an American freedom fighter is at West Potomac Park, Washington, DC 20037 (Google Map). It is a short walk from Signers’ Island and DAR Constitution Hall. John Paul Jones is buried in the crypt below the chapel at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. For more information about this famous sailor see John Paul Jones .

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The image, John Paul Jones – Father of the American Navy, is subject to copyright by Sheena 2.0™. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


John Paul Jones

September 17, 2007

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I have not yet begun to fight!

In 1953, John Paul Jones was remembered by Americans as “The Fighting Sailor.” He was actually much more than that.

He was born John Paul in 1747, on the southern coast of Scotland. He began his career as a mariner at the age of 13, when he sailed out of Whitehaven as a ship’s apprentice. During his sailing career, he had numerous contacts with his brother who had settled at Fredericksburg, Virginia.

He adopted the alias of “John Jones”, at the suggestion of this brother, when he fled to his Virginia home in 1773, to avoid execution after an incident where he was accused of murdering a sailor under his command. When the American Revolution commenced, he was using the name “John Paul Jones.” Although he is considered the father of the United States Navy, he never rose above the rank of Captain in the Continental Navy. With his highly regarded command of the frigate Bonhomme Richard, John Paul Jones became America’s first naval hero. He later earned the rank of Admiral for his service with the Russian Navy. He spent his last days abroad and ended up being buried in Paris, France. Years later his remains were brought home and reinterred at the United States Navy Academy chapel, in Annapolis, Maryland.

He is most famous for his legendary reply when a British officer asked for his surrender during battle: I have not yet begun to fight!

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The image, John Paul Jones: Fighting Sailor, 1953, is subject to copyright by Marxchivist. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus

May 25, 2007

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Many of the military officers of the American Revolution patterned their service on the life of this ancient legendary Roman, Cincinnatus, of 458 BC, who left his farm at the call of his country during a war emergency. At the ending of the Revolutionary War, the Society of the Cincinnati was formed by many of these first American “citizen soldiers” with General George Washington as the society’s first president. The Ohio city of Cincinnati was named in honor of the Society by its founder who was a member of the prestigious organization.

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The image, Cincinnati – Sawyer Point: Cincinnatus Statue, is subject to copyright by wallyg. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


The Swamp Fox

April 23, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

He was Francis Marion (1732-1795) of South Carolina.

In the year 2006, the U.S. House of Representatives finally approved a monument to General Francis Marion, to be built in Washington, D.C. The bill, however, died in the Senate and was reintroduced in January, 2007.

Marion began his military career in June of 1775. When he joined General Horatio Gates just before the Battle of Camden, Gates had no confidence in him and got rid of him by giving him command of the Williamsburg Militia in the Pee Dee area of the colony.

With his militiamen irregulars Marion proved himself to be a leader. “Marion’s Men” served without pay, supplied their own horses, arms, and often their own rations. They became quite adept at capturing their needed supplies from the Tories.

The British came to despise Marion and made repeated efforts to destroy his force, but Marion had excellent intelligence gathering ability and was always able to outsmart them. In desparation, the British sent Colonel Banastre Tarleton to capture the “old swamp fox”, who eluded the enemy by travelling the swamp paths.

Once Marion showed his ability as a guerilla fighter he was commissioned a brigadier-general of South Carolina troops. Francis Marion is buried at Belle Isle Plantation Cemetery in Berkeley County, South Carolina, where his gravestone records that he “lived without fear, and died without reproach.

This sculpture created by T.J. Dixon and James Nelson, is at the corner of Broad and Main in Greenville, South Carolina.

The image, Francis Marion The Swamp Fox, 1732-1795, is subject to copyright by sisudave. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.

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