Washington’s Headquarters – Brandywine Battlefield

January 19, 2012

Revolutionary War Image

On the eve of the Battle of Brandywine, George Washington established his headquarters in the home of a Quaker farmer and miller, Benjamin Ring. The house was near Chadd’s Ford where the British were expected to cross the river. With superior tacts and knowledge of the terrain, the British easily outwitted General Washington and the Americans lost the battle September 11th, 1777.

Slide Show of my Photographs, December 2011

The image, Washington’s Headquarters – Benjamin Ring House, is subject to copyright by Edna Barney. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, an administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Then Rose Sam Adams

December 6, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

Recall the early days of the first Continental Congress in Philadelphia, during the fall of 1774. With Boston occupied by British troops, there were rumors of imminent hostilities and fears of an impending war. In this time of peril, someone suggested that they pray. But there were objections. “They were too divided in religious sentiment,” what with Episcopalians and Quakers, Anabaptists and Congregationalists, Presbyterians and Catholics.

Then Sam Adams rose, and said he would hear a prayer from anyone of piety and good character, as long as they were a patriot.

And so together they prayed, and together they fought, and together, by the grace of God, they founded this great nation.

And in that spirit, let us give thanks to the divine “author of liberty.” And together, let us pray that this land may always be blessed, “with freedom’s holy light.”

God bless this great land, the United States of America.  ~~Mitt Romney in his “Faith of My Fathers” speech, 6 December 2007.

Learn More: The American Revolution

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The image, Sam Adams, is subject to copyright by Freddy Kugler. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Thompson-Neely House

December 2, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

December 1776:

Robert and Hannah Thompson were the owners of the Thompson-Neely House during the American Revolution. Now located at Washington Crossing Historic Park, it was one of the local houses, known as “flying hospitals”, used by the Army during the bitter winter 1776/1777. The hospital was probably attached to General Lord Stirling’s brigade, although he never had his headquarters here.

General Lord Stirling was the commanding officer of the American troops encamped along the Delaware River.

After the first Battle of Trenton, future American President James Monroe and William Washington, of Lord Stirling’s Brigade, were believed to have been brought back to the Thompson-Neely House to heal from the severe wounds they received in battle.

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The image, Thompson-Neely House, is subject to copyright by Philly Stan. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Molly Pitcher Monument

July 14, 2006

Revolutionary War Image
Mary Ludwig Hayes McCauley is buried at Old Cemetery, Carlisle, Pennsylvania. She was the most famous “Molly Pitcher” of the American Revolution, a nickname for women who carried water to the troops during the war.

Mary was with her husband, a soldier in the American army, and gained her fame as “the” Molly Pitcher at the Battle of Monmouth in June of 1778. A contemporary witness described the scene of husband-wife team, William and Mary:

“A woman whose husband belonged to the artillery and who was then attached to a piece in the engagement, attended with her husband at the piece the whole time. While in the act of reaching a cartridge and having one of her feet as far before the other as she could stemp, a cannon shot from the enemey passed directly between her legs without doing any other damage than carrying away all the lower part of her petticoat. Looking at it with apparent unconcern, she observed that it was lucky it did not pass a little higher, for in that case it might have carried away something else, and continued her occupation.”

Mary died about 1832, and one hundred years later a marker memorializing her Revolutionary War service was placed on her presumed grave. More information on this famous Molly Pitcher may be found at http://www.usfaa.com/awards/mollypitcher/ .

The image, Molly Pitcher Monument, was originally uploaded at Flickr by oppositeofsuper. It is posted here by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


A Molly Pitcher

July 9, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Old Cemetery, Carlisle, Pennsylvania

Mary Hays McCauly was an artillery wife who shared the hardships of Valley Forge with her husband, William Hays. It was during the blazing heat at the Battle of Monmouth, June 28, 1778, that she became known as the legendary Molly Pitcher, as she carried water to cool the hot guns and bathe the parched soldier throats. When her husband fell wounded while manning the canon, without hesitation, Molly stepped forward and took his place.

Molly Pitcher was a name given to women during wartime who carried water during battle. The woman or women who were Molly Pitchers at the Battle of Monmouth Battle served the Revolution well. However they were not the only Molly Pitchers of the American Revolution. Molly Pitchers participated in all the American wars before the American Revolution.

The image, Molly Pitcher, was originally uploaded at Flickr by oppositeofsuper. It is posted here by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


The Crossing

June 3, 2006

Washington crossed the Delaware River on a frigid December 25th in 1776. There is a famous portrait by Leutze of the historic event.

Washington Crossing the Delaware

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The image, George Washington, is subject to copyright by nancydowd. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, an administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.