Saratoga, New York

July 24, 2008

Revolutionary War Image

The Saratoga Victory Monument at Schulyerville, New York, commemorates the surrender of British forces during the Battle of Saratoga in 1777.

Learn More: The American Revolution

The Battle of Saratoga was fought in September and October of 1777. It was a decisive American victory which resulted in the surrender of the entire British army that was invading New York from Canada. The picture of the canons is from Saratoga National Historical Park, overlooking the Hudson River Valley, in New York.

Save To: gif ”Digg”

The image, SARATOGA MONUMENT, is subject to copyright by MIKECNY. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Gentleman Johnny Burgoyne

October 2, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

The British knew him as “Gentleman Johnny Burgoyne.” The Contintentals defeated him and his “World’s Greatest Army” at the Battle of Saratoga. On October 17th 1777, British General John Burgoyne (1722–1792) surrendered his army of 6,000 men to the American “Rabble in Arms”.

The blue plaque honors the place where this British military officer, politician and dramatist lived and died: Hertford Street W1, Mayfair, London, England.

Learn More: The American Revolution

Save To: gif ”Digg”

The image, Gentleman Johnny Burgoyne, is subject to copyright by Jamie Barras. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Patriots’ Graves

March 18, 2007

Revolutionary War Image 

Revolutionary War Graveyard in Salem, New York.

After the Battle of Saratoga in 1777, according to local legend, about 100 soldiers’ bodies were loaded like “cord wood” onto wagons and brought to Salem’s burying grounds and placed in a common grave. In addition, this cemetery contains documented remains of 101 soldiers and veterans of the American Revolution, making it probably the cemetery with the greatest number of Revolutionary War soldiers in New York State.

Listing of the Soldier Burials

Learn More: The American Revolution

Save To: gif ”Digg”

The image, FALLEN SOLDIERS, is subject to copyright by MIKECNY. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Monument to Benedict Arnold

February 28, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

Benedict Arnold was wounded in action twice, both times in the leg, while fighting with the rebels at Quebec and Saratoga. This monument honors his leg only, as he later switched sides and betrayed his country.

During his 1777 campaign, British General Burgoyne attempted to split New England away from the rest of the colonies. At Breyman Redoubt on the Saratoga battlefield, American forces, rallied by Benedict Arnold, broke through the British defenses, forcing a retreat of Burgoyne’s remaining troops. A few days later the King’s army was surrounded and forced to surrender.

Without the heroic actions of Benedict Arnold, the Americans would not have won the Battle of Saratoga. It was possibly during his long recuperation from the severe leg wound that he received there, he fell under the influence of his loyalist in-laws, and turned traitor. According to period letters and diaries, they worked on him incessantly, reminding him of the disrespect that General Gates had shown to him by relieving him of command just before the battle.

Some historians believe that had he not turned traitor, he would have gone down in history as one of America’s greatest patriots – almost at the lofty heights of John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and George Washington. Now his name is much worse than Dr. Mudd’s.

This image was made in Saratoga County, New York (map).

Learn More: The American Revolution

Save To: gif ”Digg”

The image, Monument to Benedict Arnold, is subject to copyright by Captain Oblivious. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Battle of Saratoga

December 9, 2005

KRL (179)Originally uploaded by K. Richard Lund.

Hudson River from the Great Redoubt at Saratoga Battlefield, New York