Michie Tavern Interior

December 2, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

William Michie, the original proprietor of the tavern, was a corporal at Valley Forge when he requested leave from the Revolutionary War to return home to his ailing father. When he arrived, his father had already passed away. Michie inherited his father’s land and in 1784, he established Michie’s Tavern in western Albemarle at the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. In the 1920s, his tavern was sold and moved to the site where it is now, next to Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, outside of Charlottesville, Virginia.

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The image, Michie Tavern sleeping room, is subject to copyright by afagen. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


President James Monroe

November 27, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

James Monroe was born at Monroe’s Creek in Westmoreland County, Virginia, to Scottish – Welsh parents. In 1774, he began studying at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg. The next year, with Revolutionary War fever sweeping the country, he dropped out of school to join the Williamsburg Militia. He eventually enlisted in the Third Virginia Regiment in 1776, and at eighteen years of age he was crossing the Delaware River with General George Washington that December. He was later wounded at the Battle of Trenton, and camped during the next winter of 1777, at Valley Forge. James Monroe had a distinguished military career, rising to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. In addition to Trenton, he fought in the battles of Harlem Heights, White Plains, Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth.

James Monroe was the last Revolutionary War officer to serve as President of the United States. He was elected in 1816 and 1820. The statue is from his home Ash Lawn-Highland in Albemarle County, Virginia.

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The image, James Monroe, is subject to copyright by afagen. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Virginia’s Fighting Quakers

August 1, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

By the mid 1700s, the colony of Virginia had a substantial population of Quakers. However, for various reasons, the Society of Friends moved West and left sparsley attended or abandoned meeting houses along the way. One of the causes of the great migration of Virginia Quaker families into Ohio had to do with the Revolutionary War. Young men of the best Quaker families were most eager to join on with the Revolutionary Army of Virginia. They were promptly disowned by their Quaker meetings. Many of those fighting Quakers who survived the War were reinstated into membership after the War was finished and won. They, along with descendants of non-Quaker fallen soldiers were granted land bounties by the Legislature of Virginia in the Virginia Military District of Ohio. This was an enormous tract of land set off by the United States Congress for the Commonwealth of Virginia to repay her citizen soldiers for their sacrifices and service. The District of Ohio included the present day counties of Clermont, Brown, Adams, Highland, Clinton, Fayette, Madison, Union and portions of Warren, Greene, Clark, Champaigne, Logan, Hardin, Marion, Delaware, Franklin, Pickaway, Ross, Pike and Scioto. Over 8000 land warrants were issued to Virginia soldiers in the Virginia Military District of Ohio alone. The warrants ranged from 100 acres to an army private who served three years, up to 1100 acres to a general who served three years. These warrants became a great inducement for Virginia’s Revolutionary War veterans to go west to Ohio. A number of so-called Fighting Quakers from Virginia’s South River Meeting received such warrants.

If you are seeking your own ancestors, start with “Virginia Revolutionary Records” by Gaius Marcus Brumbaugh, Volume I. ~~Edna Barney

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The image, Ten Crucial Days/A Young Patriot, is subject to copyright by Mark K_NJ. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


Richard Henry Lee

June 2, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

Richard Henry Lee was born in this Virginia home, Stratford Hall. Lee was appointed to frame the Declaration of Rights of the Colonies, which he introduced before the Continental Congress on June 7, 1776:

“…That these united Colonies are, and ought to be, free and independent States, that they are absolved from all allegiance from the British crown, and than all political connection between America and State of Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved…”

On July 2 of 1776, the bill was adopted, officially dissolving all ties with England. Two days later, on July 4, 1776, the Declaration of Independence was ratified and the American Revolution became a reality.

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The image, Stratford Hall, is subject to copyright by wanderingz. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


George Mason

April 19, 2007

Revolutionary War Image

Few of America’s founding fathers have had a more lasting impact upon our nation than a shy, cerebral planter from Virginia, a Fairfax County neighbor of George Washington, George Mason of Gunston Hall.

All men are born equally free and independent, and have certain inherent natural rights, of which they can not by any compact, deprive or divest their posterity; among which are the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety; proclaimed George Mason to Virginia’s patriots and to the world, in the spring of 1776.

Closet Tories and aristocrats trembled with fear at the idea of all mankind being equally free, but George Mason’s wondrous words of hope survived, promising human rights for all. When you demand your rights, say a prayer of gratitude to George Mason of Virginia, father of the Bill of Rights. The Fifth Virginia Convention of 1776, on June 12th, adopted George Mason’s Declaration of Rights, a precursor to the United States Bill of Rights. On June 29th, the Convention approved the first Constitution of Virginia.

This statue of George Mason is seen at the Welcome Center at his home, Gunston Hall, Mason Neck, Virginia. There is more at My Picasa Albums picasaweb.google.com/barneykin/GunstonHall.

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The image, George Mason, is subject to copyright by barneykin. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, an administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


America’s First and Greatest Hero

February 22, 2007

“First in war, first in peace, first in the hearts of his countrymen.”

Revolutionary War Image

George WASHINGTON (1732 – 1799) was born on February 22, 1732, at “Popes Creek”, a home that his father had built in the 1720s in Westmoreland County, Virginia. In 1770, “Popes Creek” was renamed “Wakefield”, and on Christmas Day of 1779, Washington’s birthplace burned to the ground, leaving only the crushed oyster shell foundation remaining. George Washington was raised there and in Fairfax and King George Counties, Virginia.

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The image, Wakefield Historical Marker, is subject to copyright by jeffq. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


March to Freedom

September 12, 2006

King’s Highway

PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY, VIRGINIA . . . The Prince William County Historic Preservation Division will host King’s Highway: March to Freedom on Saturday and Sunday, September 16 and 17, at Rippon Lodge Historic Site, 15500 Blackburn Road  in Woodbridge.  The event will be held from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. 

Admission is $5 per adult and $3 per child with children four and under free.  Highlights include tours, living history demonstrations and presentations.  George Washington will visit the site accompanied by Continental Army Dragoons to inspect improvements to the road bed! 

For more information please contact Barbara Rahll at (703)499-9812 or brahll@pwcgov.org.