The Lucky Sloop of the Revolution

July 18, 2008

Revolutionary War Image

The Providence was the first ship of the Rhode Island Navy during the American Revolution. The sloop was first named Katy and was built in Providence, Rhode Island. When she became part of the fleet of the Continental Navy, her name was changed to Providence.

She was the first command of John Paul Jones in the American Navy, and she became nicknamed “The Lucky Sloop” for the more than forty battles that she won. In 1779, Providence was scuttled by her own crew to prevent the British from taking her. Her remains now lay at the bottom of the Penobscot River, near Bucksport, Maine. This 126 foot replica was built in 1976, in honor of America’s Bicentennial.

History of the Sloop Providence

Learn More: The American Revolution

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The image, Providence, is subject to copyright by Sparechange63. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.

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Sail Fast In Harm’s Way

February 6, 2008

Revolutionary War Image

John Paul Jones – Father of the American Navy: “Sail fast, for I intend to go in harm’s way.”

This monument of an American freedom fighter is at West Potomac Park, Washington, DC 20037 (Google Map). It is a short walk from Signers’ Island and DAR Constitution Hall. John Paul Jones is buried in the crypt below the chapel at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. For more information about this famous sailor see John Paul Jones .

Learn More: The American Revolution

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The image, John Paul Jones – Father of the American Navy, is subject to copyright by Sheena 2.0™. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


John Paul Jones

August 3, 2006

Revolutionary War Image

Memorial Plaque, Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington DC

“I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast, for I intend to go in harm’s way.” ~John Paul Jones, Naval Hero of the American Revolution and Father of the American Navy.

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The image, Navy Memorial 3-D plaque – John Paul Jones, is subject to copyright by etacar11. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin, administrator of “The Revolution flickred” pool.


4th of July, 2006

July 4, 2006

Revolutionary War Image
The following is from “Don’t Tread On Me Flag History”:

In the fall of 1775, as the first ships of the Continental Navy readied in the Delaware River, Commodore Esek Hopkins issued a set of fleet signals. Among these signals was an instruction directing his vessels to fly a striped Jack and Ensign at their proper places. The custom of the jack-type flag had originated with the Royal Navy in the 15th century or earlier; such was the likely source of Hopkins’ inspiration. This first U.S. Navy Jack has traditionally been shown as consisting of 13 horizontal alternating red and white stripes with a superimposed rattlesnake and the motto “Don’t Tread on Me.” The rattlesnake had long been a symbol of resistance to British repressive acts in Colonial America; its display on the new jack of the fledging Continental Navy fit naturally with the fervor of the times.

In 1975, the Secretary of the Navy directed that the First Navy Jack be flown in 1975 and 1976 in lieu of the Union Jack during the United States Bicentennial Year as a colorful and historic reminder of the nation’s and the Navy’s origin.

On May 22, 2002, the U.S. Navy ordered all ships to display the First Navy Jack during the War on Terrorism.

The First U.S. Navy Union Jack Waves at My Front Door. The image, 4th of July, 2006, was originally uploaded by me, barneykin. It is posted here from Neddy’s flickr.